Rock of Cashel

Cashel, Ireland

According to local mythology, the Rock of Cashel originated in the Devil's Bit, a mountain 20 miles (30 km) north of Cashel when St. Patrick banished Satan from a cave, resulting in the Rock's landing in Cashel. Cashel is reputed to be the site of the conversion of the King of Munster by St. Patrick in the 5th century.

The Rock of Cashel was the traditional seat of the kings of Munster for several hundred years prior to the Norman invasion. In 1101, the King of Munster, Muirchertach Ua Briain, donated his fortress on the Rock to the Church. The picturesque complex has a character of its own and is one of the most remarkable collections of Celtic art and medieval architecture to be found anywhere in Europe. Few remnants of the early structures survive; the majority of buildings on the current site date from the 12th and 13th centuries.

The oldest and tallest of the present buildings is the well preserved round tower, dating from c.1100.

Cormac's Chapel, the chapel of King Cormac Mac Carthaigh, was begun in 1127 and consecrated in 1134. It is a very sophisticated structure, unlike most Irish Romanesque churches, which are ordinarily simple in plan with isolated decorated features. The Irish Abbot of Regensburg, Dirmicius of Regensburg, sent two of his carpenters to help in the work and the twin towers on either side of the junction of the nave and chancel are strongly suggestive of their Germanic influence, as this feature is otherwise unknown in Ireland. Other notable features of the building include interior and exterior arcading, a barrel-vaulted roof, a carved tympanum over both doorways, the magnificent north doorway and chancel arch. It contains one of the best preserved Irish frescoes from this time period. The Chapel was constructed primarily of sandstone which has become water logged over the centuries, significantly damaging the interior frescos. Restoration and preservation required the chapel be completely enclosed in a rain-proof structure with interior dehumifiers to dry out the stone.

The Cathedral, built between 1235 and 1270, is an aisleless building of cruciform plan, having a central tower and terminating westwards in a massive residential castle. The Hall of the Vicars Choral was built in the 15th century. The restoration of the Hall was undertaken in 1975.

In 1647, during the Irish Confederate Wars, Cashel was sacked by English Parliamentarian troops under Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin. The Irish Confederate troops there were massacred, as were the Roman Catholic clergy, including Theobald Stapleton. Inchiquin's troops looted or destroyed many important religious artefacts.

In 1749 the main cathedral roof was removed by Arthur Price, the Anglican Archbishop of Cashel. Today, what remains of the Rock of Cashel has become a tourist attraction. Price's decision to remove the roof on what had been the jewel among Irish church buildings was criticised before and since.

The entire plateau on which the buildings and graveyard lie is walled. In the grounds around the buildings an extensive graveyard includes a number of high crosses. Scully's Cross, one of the largest and most famous high crosses here, originally constructed in 1867 to commemorate the Scully family, was destroyed in 1976 when lightning struck a metal rod that ran the length of the cross. The remains of the top of the cross now lie at the base of the cross adjacent to the rock wall.

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Address

Rock Lane , Cashel, Ireland
See all sites in Cashel

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Ireland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Deborah Eveillard (20 months ago)
€4.50 for parking. €8 entrance guided tour fee for general admission and €11 to also see inside the chapel. There are so many spectacular views of the castle and its surroundings - inside and out. It was enjoyable to learn about the castle and surroundings from our knowledgeable tour guide. A must see! The village is quaint and nice to visit and eat. It was a lovely day!
Edward Wollner (20 months ago)
Very cool castle which was one of my favorite stops in all of Ireland. Its location in the heart of a quaint village and the grounds surrounding the castle make the whole thing that much more worth visiting.
János Farkas (20 months ago)
There are 2 guided tours, one for generally the place, and one for the chapel. However it would be good if the time frame for them not overlap. We enjoyed our hours there, thanks to our guides!
Riccardo Fusco (21 months ago)
A true Irish landmark that really deserves a visit. With restorations complete, it is possible to visit all and photograph all as it deserves to be. A great place for old and young. So central, so well kept.
j hwang (2 years ago)
Definitely a tourist attraction. It costs 8 euros to enter. Parking is free the first 20 minutes if you can speed walk the entire attraction or 4.5 euros the entire day. There are some great views of the city from a few vantage points. A good place to stop by if you're in the area and have nothing else to do or see. Otherwise, I would not go out of my way to visit.
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