Fulda Cathedral

Fulda, Germany

Influenced by Roman Baroque architecture, the Fulda cathedral was built between 1704 and 1712 by the renowned architect Johann Dietzenhofer. The cathedral is not only Fulda’s famous landmark, but also the most significant baroque religious building in the State of Hesse. During construction many parts of the previous church, the 9th century Ratgar Basilika, were integrated in the new cathedral. Since 1752 it has been the cathedral church of the Fulda diocese. The cathedral has retained its great religious significance up to today due to the tomb of St. Boniface which is still today an important place of pilgrimage.

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Address

Domplatz 5, Fulda, Germany
See all sites in Fulda

Details

Founded: 1704-1712
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Abhishek Dani (8 months ago)
The place has its charm. The cathedral along with the palace make for a stunning view
Alan Brooks (2 years ago)
Interesting and quiet
Nate Lauer (5 years ago)
A beautiful cathedral in a magnificent little city in the heart of Germany. I was so touched being able to visit the tomb of Saint Boniface, Apostle of the German speaking lands! The crypt church downstairs is where you can find his blessed final resting place.
Dascalete Alex (5 years ago)
If You want to visit the cathedral I highly recommend this place. Is a perfect place with a big square, nice clock outside and a great architecture. The boulevard is also perfect. The garden is also nice!
Wingel Mendoza (5 years ago)
Nice place
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