Cahokia Mounds is the largest pre-Columbian settlement north of Mexico. It was occupied primarily during the Mississippian period (800–1400), when it covered nearly 1,600 ha and included some 120 mounds. It is a striking example of a complex chiefdom society, with many satellite mound centres and numerous outlying hamlets and villages. This agricultural society may have had a population of 10–20,000 at its peak between 1050 and 1150. Primary features at the site include Monks Mound, the largest prehistoric earthwork in the Americas, covering over 5 ha and standing 30 m high.

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site includes 51 platform, ridgetop, and conical mounds; residential, public, and specialized activity areas; and a section of reconstructed palisade, all of which together defined the limits and internal symmetry of the settlement. Dominating the community was Monks Mound, the largest prehistoric earthen structure in the New World. Constructed in fourteen stages, it covers six hectares and rises in four terraces to a height of 30 meters. The mounds served variously as construction foundations for public buildings and as funerary tumuli. There was also an astronomical observatory, consisting of a circle of wooden posts. Extensive professional excavations have produced evidence of construction methods and the social activities of which the structures are further testimony.

Cahokia Mounds is a National Historic Landmark and a designated site for state protection. It is also one of only 23 UNESCO World Heritage Sites within the United States.

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Founded: 800-1400
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in United States

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Katherine W (5 months ago)
The history of Cahokia is amazing and awe inspiring. The Mississippian peoples built hundreds of mounds in the region, and those in the state park represent just a small fraction of all the mounds that once existed. The museum provides a great overview of the history of the Indigenous people of the time. The mounds are even more impressive once you learn about the symbolism and spirituality they are connected to. Everyone should visit!
Adam Dietrich Ringle (6 months ago)
At some point in your visit, check out the gift shop!
David Hults (6 months ago)
Ancient history is still here for our discovery!
Flynn Hayes (6 months ago)
Wonderful park. I loved this place as a kid and brought my daughter yesterday. I love that they're giving out qr codes to let people view the movie to make sure everybody's socially distanced. Very educational (even with interactive displays closed for safety during this), very well maintained location.
Jimmy Terry (7 months ago)
Lots of stairs my self am now perfectly aware of how out of shape i am
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