Béziers Cathedral

Béziers, France

St.Nazaire cathedral is te main sight in Béziers. This grandiose Romanesque cathedral dates from the 13th century. It was erected on the site of an earlier building which was destroyed during the Massacre at Béziers in the Albigensian Crusade. It occupies one of the best sites in town: from the concourse in front of the cathedral there are beautiful views out over the surrounding vineyards and towards the foothills of the Massif Central to the north.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ian Morton (9 months ago)
The highlight of any trip to Beziers is the cathedral. Originally built in the 10th Century the building was totally destroyed and rebuilt over many centuries until completion in the 15th Century. The inside is impressive, but the position of the Cathedral overlooking the Orb Plain dominates the horizon for many miles. Best viewed from the Pont Vieux or the gardens around the Eglise St Jaques. The views from the cathedral gardens over the lower city, the river Orb and the surrounding plain are also worth seeing.
Patrick Watters (10 months ago)
Oh it is worth a visit to the top...only if you are fit... great views of lovely Beziers
Jeremy Thanks (11 months ago)
Good services and friendly greeters.
Edward Daniels (15 months ago)
breath taking cathedral with amazing architecture, well worth seeing if youre in the area! 170 steps up to the tower is worth it for the amazing view out over the town and surrounding countryside
Russ Pinder (16 months ago)
Lovely old Cathedral away from the tourist trail. Wheelchair access to the ground floor is good but no chance of getting up in the towers. Great views of the surrounding countryside even from ground level.
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