One of eight remaining historic turf labyrinths in England, the Wing maze was probably built by medieval monks for religious purposes.

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Founded: Medieval
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3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Keith Watts (10 months ago)
Blink and you miss it. Read the information board for some interesting facts and history.
Sian Jones (11 months ago)
One of only 8 historic turf mazes in England. If you're expecting Hampton Court Maze, you'll be disappointed; turf mazes are modest in size but of great historic interest. This one is medieval and resembles one at Chartres cathedral (though probably not a direct copy). Unfortunately it's fenced off so it's not clear if walking round it is allowed. NOT appropriate for a day out, just a view on the way to somewhere else . There's a good modern one not that far away at Lyvedon New Bield (NT) created by mowing on top of the lost original, which you can walk, and other activities plus a tea room.
Simon Danton (12 months ago)
Not exactly a maze
Alexis Grimshaw (2 years ago)
A well kept small local attraction with loads of history. Don't expect to make a full day of it.
David Naudusevics (2 years ago)
Interesting place for a quick historic visit
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