The Saffron Walden maze is the largest of the eight historic turf labyrinths still in existence in England. Although probably created in the Middle Ages for religious purposes, the maze has more recently been used for games and festivities.

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Founded: Probably medieval
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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Tony Ruel (5 months ago)
What a fantastic clean welcoming place to eat. Everything was perfect
Lee Metters (5 months ago)
Nice food and friendly atmosphere
Richard Palmer (5 months ago)
Went in for Saturday lunch. Food good quality and not too expensive. Service was excellent.
Ashley Norman (7 months ago)
Fantastic place to eat. Table for 6, small Christmas gathering. Had several dishes to share for starter. Many beautiful flavours to get the appetite going. Then had the mix grill for main... Best flame grilled meat since cave man fire!! to top it off it was all served by some lovely hard working staff! Thankyou guys will be recommending Ashley
Elliott Curtis (8 months ago)
Beautiful atmosphere. My first time experiencing Turkish cuisine and our host was so polite and helpful. The food was amazing. I've never had lamb so tender and tasteful. Would definitely recommend!
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Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

After having been exposed to all kinds of weather for a thousand years cracks are beginning to show. On the 15th of November 2008 experts from UNESCO examined the stones to determine their condition. Experts requested that the stones be moved to an indoor exhibition hall, or in some other way protected in situ, to prevent further damage from the weather.

Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.