Mission of San Juan Capistrano

San Juan Capistrano, United States

The Mission of San Juan Capistrano is one of several Spanish missions in California built for the purpose of converting people to the Catholic faith. Established in 1776 it was the largest Spanish building in California. Unfortunately it was partly destroyed by an earthquake in 1812 and gradually fell into disuse. However it was revived in the 20th century and is now once more a flourishing ministry.

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Founded: 18th century
Category: Religious sites in United States

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Don Rose (16 months ago)
What a magical place! Historic, with a truly moving nonprofit with key focus on preservation & early history of California Mission heritage & culture. Today, it's still a very spiritual place with big focus on education--70,000 4th graders visiting annually! The peaceful emergence of Spanish & Native American cultures is a wonderful story. Visit & savor the magic yourself.
Jessica Purdy (16 months ago)
A beautiful mission and grounds. Parking is located down the street from the mission. You will walk about a block to the Mission Museum entrance. You pay to get in the grounds and can get and audio tour if you wanted. The gift shop is also located at the entrance and you don't have to pay if you just wanted to go in the shop. The grounds are large and well kept. It is easy to maneuver through and the ground is even in the majority of the mission. You can see still the ruins of the old chapel that was damaged in an earthquake. You can see the seashells that were used in the crafting of the walls. You can see how the grounds was than used as an ranch in the 1800's. Each room is shown on how it was used for the household. To the north end is where the new chapel sits and is still in operation. You can visit the website to book weddings or other activities. Prices vary. The swallows still visit the grounds to nest each year.
Mat Berger (16 months ago)
The work they did to maintain and protect this historical Mission is really incredible. The gardens were for me the highlight of the site. Beautiful and well maintained. I really loved the free audio guide. Very convenient. Bathrooms are clean. The shop at the exit is quite nice! Make sure to check it out too. Staff was very nice and friendly, greatly appreciated! I parked on the street right by the Mission (they have 2 hours free parking spots around). Take your time there, seat on one of their bench and enjoy!
Some Guy (16 months ago)
Really well preserved site. Museum is excellent - detailed and nuanced. Great glimpse into the life of the people who passed through the mission. Beautiful grounds, too. The gardens are not to be missed. The church itself is exceptionally well maintained and beautiful.
Jojopahmaria Nsoroma (18 months ago)
Go early because there is much to explore and experience. The chapel, which is the only part of the Great Church that survived the 1812 earthquake, is a high spiritual experience. Native, First Nations history is acknowledged. You can park in the school lot across from the East Gate. There a few swallow nests left. Beautifully keep grounds. This place is sacred & magical.
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