Luzhetsky Monastery

Mozhaysk, Russia

Luzhetsky Monastery is a medieval fortified monastery in Mozhaysk founded in 1408 by Therapont of Belozersk. Therapont founded Ferapontov Monastery in 1398, located in the Principality of Beloozero, which at the time was administered jointly with the Principality of Mozhaysk. The prince, Andrey of Mozhaysk, resided in Mozhaysk, and was a brother of Vasily, the Grand Prince of Moscow. He was also one of the main sponsors of the monastery. In 1408, he sent a letter to Therapont urging him to come to Mozhaysk, and Therapont was obliged to obey. Even though Therapont, after arriving to Mozhaysk, expressed very clearly his wish to return to White Lake, the prince never let him go. They made a deal, and Therapont founded Luzhetsky Monastery in Mozhaysk. He died in the monastery in 1426. He is venered as a saint by Russian Orthodox Church.

The original cathedral was demolished in the first half of the 16th century, and a five-dome stone cathedral was built in 1524-1547, which still stands today. Mozhaysk, together with the monastery, was transferred to the Grand Duchy of Moscow in the middle of the 16th century. The history of the monastery in the 15th century is somewhat unclear; it is known that in 1523 the hegumen of Luzhetsky Monastery was Makary, who later became the Metropolitan of Moscow.

The monastery was considerably damaged during the Time of Troubles in the 1610s, when it was plundered. Most of the current architecture of the monastery, including the bell-tower, the Transfiguration Church, and the cells, were built in the 17th century. In 1812, during the Napoleonic Wars, Luzhetsky monastery was briefly occupied and plundered by the advancing French army. In 1929, it was closed by the Soviets and reopened in 1994.

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Details

Founded: 1408
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Olga Ponomareva (19 months ago)
Совсем не помпезно...Просто...Но Супер Душевно...Очень Мощное Впечатление!!! А Святой Ферапонт теперь Один из Самых Любимых Святых! Очень Светлый!!!
Мария Бобкова (19 months ago)
Небольшая по времени экскурсия, в монастыре живут два монаха, не смотря на это территория очень ухожена, везде порядок. В храме хорошо, тихо, душе спокойно.
Светланка Тихомирова (2 years ago)
Очень нрваится это место. Тихо, уютно. Храм старый, намоленый. Внутри тепло и очень красиво.
Елена Соколова (2 years ago)
Небольшой старинный монастырь, основанный прп. Ферапонтом и князем Андреем Можайским в 1408 году. В обители несколько храмов. Из святынь -мощи прп. Ферапонта и икона "Достойно есть". А также образ "Можайским святые" в иконостасе. Монастырь ремонтируется, но территория чистая, ухоженная. Примерно от монастыря, в д.Исавцы находится святой источник с купелью.
Андрей Ясеновский (2 years ago)
Единственный из восемнадцати монастырей Можайска который сохранился до наших дней. Из далека смотрится очень красиво. Новые купола блестят на солнце золотом. Но при ближайшем рассмотрении видны облезлые стены, явно требующие реставрации
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