Château de Montaigut

Gissac, France

The first traces of the Château de Montaigut date from the 10th century. Built on a rocky outcrop dominating the valley of the Dourdou de Camarès river, it defended the town of Saint-Affrique against attacks from the south. Enlarged and transformed in the 15th century by the Blanc family, it was restored several times before falling into ruin. The castle was finally restored in 1989.

The castle is built over a medieval necropolis. The castle has beautiful vaulted rooms served by a spiral staircase, a cellar, a cistern carved in the rock, a guard room and prison, bedrooms and kitchens. Visitors can admire 17th century plasterworks.

Today, the castle has become a permanent centre for cultural events. The Château de Montaigut is one of a group of 23 castles in Aveyron which have joined together to provide a tourist itinerary as the Route des Seigneurs du Rouergue.

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Address

Montégut, Gissac, France
See all sites in Gissac

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dupriez Ludivine (18 months ago)
Aucun accueil ... Pourtant ouvert à cette période, nous avons sonné comme il était indiqué. Nous nous sommes déplacés juste pour prendre des photos de paysage ... Nous sommes venus le 10 décembre 2018 vers 16h30.
Alain Frimigacci (18 months ago)
Worth the visit. They organise hunt clue games to get kids interested. The shop is not worth it though. Stock is out of date for most items and dear.
Guy Sales (18 months ago)
Une œuvre de notre histoire formidablement restauré par l'association des amis du château de Montaigut...
Milan&Nicci Popovic (2 years ago)
Lovely day out great for the family
Yen Kooy (3 years ago)
Very pleasant visit to this castle. The guided tour was so good, able to answer any questions and it's funny:-) love to come back here with my nephew as it is fun to visit the castle with costume
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