Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Richmond, United Kingdom

You might not think of a botanic garden as a historic site, but the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, London (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) have a firm place in the history of gardening. Established from a collection of royal estates in 1759, they demonstrate different garden styles through the centuries. The gardens are also home to 44 historic buildings, including royal residences, Victorian greenhouses and garden follies.

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Founded: 18th century
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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User Reviews

Ertug Ekenler (15 months ago)
Better than I expected. Was so great fun that I became a member. Now I can see Kew Gardens every season. The new children's playground looked fine, though it was not open when we visited (due to open on 18 May 2019). That should be great fun for the small ones too.
Will Hazelton (16 months ago)
Was so surprised by just how enormous this place is! Absolutely fantastic day with friends and family. Would recommend getting up early and taking a picnic. It's so huge and beautiful you could spend a whole day there. But be warned dogs and ball games aren't allowed. A must see if you are in London with a spare weekend. The value for money is amazing!
G Baptiste (16 months ago)
Kew is magical. It's stunningly beautiful. There's so much to explore. Check out the palm House, but be prepared to sweat! It has the most amazing plant life and lots of info which is great for school trips. It's a great day out if you're alone with friends or family.
Dilal Ahmed (16 months ago)
This is a great way to spend a day in London. The gardens are lovely. We booked online so entry was slightly cheaper & straightforward. We also booked the land train which we found very useful as it gave an overview of the whole gardens - which are extensive - and then we used it to hop on/off as required. It was helpful to have the main features pointed out by the train driver. Facilities are excellent.The treetop walk, while not extensive, was worthwhile. I would have enjoyed booking in for one of the events but that would require more planning than we did.
Philip Long (17 months ago)
I went to Kew today to visit the orchid display but I forgot what a wonderful place Kew is to visit. I found that the new greenhouse was spectacular. The overall care and attention is 1st class. Staff were extremely friendly and polite at the entrance. We parked which was not too expensive at £7-00 a day. My only complaint is that the restaurant serves the most appalling self-service coffee. The cakes were lovely. I would suggest people bring food with you as you could really have a lovely picnic in the warm weather. if you really like coffee avoid the self-service one but a great overall day. I could see they are in the process of building a play area for children which looks amazing. Well worth the money and time. I am definitely going back soon with a flask.
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Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.