Mutso is a small fortified village in Georgia. One of the former strongholds of the historic Georgian province of Khevsureti, it is located on a rocky mountain (1880 m) on the right bank of the Andakistskali river.

The village, almost completely abandoned more than a century ago, is a home to approximately 30 medieval fortified dwelling units arranged on vertical terraces above the Mutso-Ardoti gorge, four combat towers and ruins of several old structures and buildings. Difficult to access, the village retains original architecture, and is a popular destination for tourists and mountain trekkers. Listed, however, among the most endangered historic monuments of Georgia, a project of the rehabilitation of Mutso has been developed since 2004.

A legend has it that the villagers worshiped the Broliskalo Icon of Archangel. They were renowned as fighters and hunters, and considered themselves permanent members of the army of the sacred flags and guardians of fabulous treasury donated to the Icon over the centuries. The legends say the treasury that is still kept in the high mountains around Mutso waiting for the chosen one to come.

As the legend puts it “the Shetekauris dug Mutso”, which indirectly indicates that the family founded the village or the family history started together with the founding of Mutso.

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Founded: Middle Ages
Category: Castles and fortifications in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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Cool Georgia Travel (2 years ago)
Good
maya prangulashvili (3 years ago)
heaven
Коба Цицаги (3 years ago)
super
Lengri Maghlaperidze (3 years ago)
ულამაზესი მუცოს ხეობა.
ალექს ლანდემორ (3 years ago)
Treasure of Khevsruti and of all Georgia,must visit,explore and feel this unique architect complex of ancient times.
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