Tiedra Castle

Tiedra, Spain

Located on a hill, almost on the border of the province of Zamora, and within viewing distance of Villalonso Castle, the primitive Tiedra Castle is already mentioned in the 11th century.

The present castle seems to date from the end of the 13th century and is in a bad state of conservation. It consists of a polygonal enclosure, with a perimeter of 115 meters, equipped with two circular towers. Near one of these there are remains of a ruined wall. This could be a vestige of a second defensive enclosure. There is a dry moat on its western side.

In the 13th century a Don Alonso Téllez de Meneses was the Lord of Tiedra. In the 14th century the Lord of Tiedra was Don Sancho, Count of Alburquerque and brother of King Enrique II de Trastamara. His daughter Leonor, Countess of Alburquerque and married with Fernando de Antequera, inherited from him, amongst other possessions, Tiedra Castle. His sons Enrique and Juan, the Infants of Aragon, inherited from their father the castles of Medina del Campo and Peñafiel Castle. Both the brothers fought against King Juan II of Castile. Therefore this king confiscated Tiedra Castle and handed it over to his favorite Don Alvaro de Luna. During these wars the king incarcerated several of his enemies in Tiedra Castle; under these prisoners were the Count of Haro, the Lords of Batres and Valdecorneja and the bishop of Palencia. After his defeat, in 1445, in the battle of Olmedo, the enemies of the king, handed the castle to Don Pedro Girón, Master of Calatrava as a reward for his help. This Don Pedro Girón is the same one who would, in later years, received Peñafiel Castle from King Enrique IV.

Until the 19th century the castle belonged to ducal house of Osuna.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.castles.nl

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sir Serendey (44 days ago)
A clear example of Castilian fortification with impressive views of the surrounding lands. Well-kept exteriors, but the patio should have some decorative element. You have to visit it. Audio guide on the mobile itself. They should have a Qr Code for more convenient access.
Jose Anibal Saquero Sanz (2 months ago)
En el mes de Julio tiene lugar aquí uno de los conciertos de las "Veladas Musicales de los Castillos". Su coqueto patio de armas se llena entonces de niños, adultos y buena música. La torre tiene unas buhardas sobre ménsulas muy llamativas y una entrada con puente de madera. Cultura e Historia se unen en esa ocasión y es un buen momento para visitar también la Iglesia del Salvador, los restos de las de San Pedro y San Miguel, la Plaza Mayor con su bonito Ayuntamiento, el gran parque, sus calles y casas...y no dejar de ir a la Ermita de Tiedra Vieja.
Mariano de Pablo (2 months ago)
It was closed.
Nat Tp (3 months ago)
very well preserved castle
David Vicente (3 months ago)
Very well restored castle, with incredible views from the top. The person at the entrance very friendly and answering all our questions and facilitating the visit. Besides that it is seen that she is passionate and has great knowledge. Highly recommended
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