Castillo de las Escobetas

Garrucha, Spain

The fishing village of Garrucha suffered at the hands of Berber pirates until the year 1766 when barracks were built at Escobetas, a provisional military building. In 1769, the castle was completed at a cost of 181,000 reais. The fort was designed by the architect Francisco Ruiz Garrido. After its construction, Garrucha began to grow.

It is of masonry construction in three section. The central portion is rectangular with rounded short sides. Attached to the right lateral side, there is a truncated pyramid shape with sloping walls. In its upper part, a parapet is pierced with loopholes. The main body is attached to the left side, of lower height, without openings. It is accessed by an external staircase and one tranche that attaches to the right side.

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Details

Founded: 1766
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bryan Deards (15 months ago)
Can’t resist a castle or fort and only 1 Euro to get in !
Claudia Aguilar (15 months ago)
Super
Julia von Lueder (17 months ago)
Top
alan levene (18 months ago)
Interesting ruin. Needs better care and attention.
Layla Evans-Lowry (18 months ago)
Lovely little nautical museum with 6 little rooms to explore. Very interesting about the mining and the transport from the mountain to the port. Replica boats in the final room are wonderful. Very much worth the 1 Euro entrance fee. The lady inside was friendly too and made us feel very welcome. Parking available for a few cars and opposite plenty of parking on the beach.
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