Top Historic Sights in Augustenborg, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Augustenborg

Augustenborg Palace

Augustenborg Palace owes its name to Duchess Auguste (1633–1701). Augustenborg gave its name to the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg, the last member of which was Duke Christian August II (1798–1869). The original half-timbered manor house was built in 1660-1664 by Ernest Günther, the first Duke of Augustenborg, after he bought the village of Stavensbøl and demolished it for the land. The one-sto ...
Founded: 1733 | Location: Augustenborg, Denmark

Notmark Church

Notmark Church was built around 1200. The tower is probably built also for defensive purposes. The altarpiece dates from the 1520s as well as the Renaissance style pulpit and crucifix.
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Augustenborg, Denmark

Ketting Church

Ketting Church was built in the 12th century. The original tower is one of the best-preserved towers built also for defensive purpose in Denmark. The rest of the church was rebuilt in 1773, due to bad maintenance of the original church. In the tower there is two bells: one has been cast around 1350. The other, with a weight of 1.000 kilo is from 1554. From 1851 to 1854 Ketting church was closed because it was used as gun ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Augustenborg, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.