Top Historic Sights in Gråsten, Denmark

Explore the historic highlights of Gråsten

Gråsten Palace

The first Gråsten Palace was a small hunting lodge built in the middle of the 1500s. After it burned down in 1603, a new palace was built approximately where the south wing of the current palace is located. Chancellor Count Frederik Ahlefeldt, who was the owner of Gråsten Palace from 1662-1682, and his son built a huge baroque palace shortly before the beginning of the 1700’s. It, too, burned down in 1757. Only the pa ...
Founded: 1759 | Location: Gråsten, Denmark

Kværs Church

Kværs Church has a Romanesque chancel and have two newer extensions. West of the church stands a wooden belfry, built in 1815. An early Gothic figure of John the Baptist, from the 14th century, stands in the church and on the late Gothic bell is a primitive relief of one of the district"s most revered saints, St. Helper.
Founded: 1150-1200 | Location: Gråsten, Denmark

Rinkenæs Old Church

Rinkenæs Old Church was built in 1158 in the Romanesque style. The church is found at the top of a hill. Originally it was surroundd by a village, however this disappeared around year 1300. In several places a close examination of the bricks will reveal marks which are traces of the many wars in the region: in addition, the church yard contains several historical relics, in particular of the Schleswig battles of the 19th ...
Founded: 1158 | Location: Gråsten, Denmark

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.