Top Historic Sights in Kangasala, Finland

Explore the historic highlights of Kangasala

Mobilia

Mobilia museum specializes in cars and road traffic. The exhibitions illustrate the history of the field in Finland, where long distances have always given both roads and vehicles particular importance. The exhibitions change annually, focusing on different sub-themes of automobile traffic. The exhibitions are planned with foresight; the exact subjects are known years ahead. A wide collection of photos and other objects i ...
Founded: 1986 | Location: Kangasala, Finland

Kangasala Church

Kangasala grey granite church, with its beautiful baroque star ceiling, was built in 1767. Its rare wooden sculptures, dating back to the 15th century, make the church particularly fascinating. The tower collapsed in 1782 and the new one was completed in 1800.There is a "bleeding stone" in the wall which is known among the local people. According the legend the girl called "Kuussalon Kaarina" was beheaded on it.During the ...
Founded: 1767 | Location: Kangasala, Finland

Vehoniemi Automotive Museum

Vehoniemi Automotive Museum exhibition consists about 50 restored cars and motocycles. In the museum you can see for example the only Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL Waxenberger 6.3 in the world and Trabant donated to the Police of Finland. The museum is located in the Vehoniemenharju preservation area. The observation tower has a nice view over the Roine and Längelmävesi lakes.
Founded: 1983 | Location: Kangasala, Finland

Liuksiala Manor

Liuksiala estate has been known since the 14th century. The first church building in Kangasala may had been located at Liuksiala. The 'King"s manor' (Kungsgård) was established to Liuksiala in 1566. The most famous resident of Liuksiala was Kaarina Maununtytär (Karin Månsdotter), the former Queen of Sweden. After the power struggle between Eric XIV and his brother John III, Eric was defeate ...
Founded: 1802 | Location: Kangasala, Finland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.