Liuksiala estate has been known since the 14th century. The first church building in Kangasala may had been located at Liuksiala. The 'King's manor' (Kungsgård) was established to Liuksiala in 1566. The most famous resident of Liuksiala was Kaarina Maununtytär (Karin Månsdotter), the former Queen of Sweden. After the power struggle between Eric XIV and his brother John III, Eric was defeated and prisoned. Queen Kaarina and her children were separated from her husband in 1573 to prevent the birth of any more legitimate offspring. She was treated with kindness and given the royal estate Liuksiala Manor, where she lived the rest of her life. Later Liuksiala has been owned by Kaarina's daughter Sigrid Vasa, Tott and Creutz noble families. Since 1821 it has been owned by Meurman family.

The current manor house foundation dates from the 1804 and the appearance from 1902. The stone cellar may be built already in the 16th century. The chapel, designed by Josef Stenbäck, was built in 1917-1932. Liuksiala is privately owned and not open to the public.

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