Top Historic Sights in Brodnica, Poland

Explore the historic highlights of Brodnica

Brodnica Castle Ruins

Teutonic Castle Ruins from the 14th century with the high tower (56 m high) has been survived to the nowadays in Brodnica. The castle was the headquarters of the commander of Brodnica and was one of the most powerful Teutonic castles. During the 13-year war was occupied by the Polish army in 1454 and 1463. From 1479 to the partition of Poland in 1772 the castle was the seat of Polish mayors (1485-1604 Działyński ...
Founded: 1305-1330 | Location: Brodnica, Poland

Palace of Anna Vasa

Palace of Anna Vasa, a Swedish Princess, was built before 1564 at the Teutonic castle area by the Brodnica County starost Rafał Działyński, partly with the use of the Gothic walls. The palace was rebuilt and expanded as a residence by Anna Vasa of Sweden in the years 1605-1616 then it was the seat of successive starosts. Burned by Russians in 1945 and reconstructed in 1969. During its existence there reside ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Brodnica, Poland

St. Catherine's Church

Gothic Church of St. Catherine was built between 1310-1370 by the Teutonic Knights. In the years 1554-1598 it was used by Lutherans. After damage in 1631 and 1648 was renewed in the 2nd half of the 17th century. Three-nave hall church with square-closed chancel and the west facade with tower from the 15th century. Inside there are 15th-century starlike vaults, fragments of wall murals: Gothic, Renaissance from about 1582, ...
Founded: 1310-1370 | Location: Brodnica, Poland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.