Palace of Anna Vasa

Brodnica, Poland

Palace of Anna Vasa, a Swedish Princess, was built before 1564 at the Teutonic castle area by the Brodnica County starost Rafał Działyński, partly with the use of the Gothic walls. The palace was rebuilt and expanded as a residence by Anna Vasa of Sweden in the years 1605-1616 then it was the seat of successive starosts. Burned by Russians in 1945 and reconstructed in 1969. During its existence there resided starosts of prominent families. From the early 17th century Brodnica county was granted to members of the royal family. Besides Anna Vasa of Sweden the Brodnica starosts were: Constance wife of Polish King Sigismund III Vasa, his daughter Anna Catherine, wife of King Wladyslaw IV - Cecilia Renata, and his advisor and the Great Crown Chancellor Jerzy Tęczyn Ossoliński, Maria Kazimiera - wife of John III Sobieski, Crown Hetman Marcin Kalinowski and the Great crown Marshal Marshal Francis Balinski. Currently it houses a library and museum.

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Address

Zamkowa 1, Brodnica, Poland
See all sites in Brodnica

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

More Information

www.visittorun.pl

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grzegorz (8 months ago)
Polecam cudowne historyczne miejsce
jakoś leci (8 months ago)
Warto odwiedzic. Duzo ksiazek
Arkadiusz Klosowski (9 months ago)
Ładne miejsce oraz odbywają się interesujące spotkania.
Natalia Michalska (9 months ago)
Piękny budynek. Posiada parking
Dorota Dycha (10 months ago)
Doskonały obiekt na bankiety.
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