Top Historic Sights in Ängelholm, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Ängelholm

Ängelholm Church

Luntertun, the old town at the mouth of the River Rönne å, features the ruins of the medieval predecessor of Ängelholm church. The only fixture from Luntertun is the church tower from 1470. The present church was built in 1868, and the interior is from 1941. Altar screen and stained glass have been made by Torsten Nordberg.
Founded: 1868 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Ängelholm Old Town Hall

The lovely old town hall from 1775 in the main square today houses the tourist information. It became too small for the town in 1896.
Founded: 1775 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Munka Ljungby Church

Munka Ljungby Church was probably built in the 12th Century by the monks of Herrevadkloster, who owned large tracts of land, including parts of Munka Ljungby, the name meaning Ljungby of the monks. The transepts date from the 1860s. The altarpiece is a copy of a painting by the 17th century artist Rubens.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Vegeholm Castle

Vegeholm Castle was first built as a danish castle in the early 16th century, and was burned in 1525. It was rebuilt again in 1630 by the Danish Tyge Krabbe. It was owned by his family until 1663, when it was bought by Gustaf Otto Stenbock. After his death it was first possessed by Olof Nilsson Engelholm and thereafter by Johan Cedercrantz. His family owned Vegeholm Castle until 1814 when it was thoroughly renovated. It c ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Barkåkra Church

Barkåkra Church was originally built in the 12th century. It was fully restored in the 19th century. The older pieces, including the Baptismal font, are from the early 12th century. The retable by David Jastro dates from the 18th Century. The painted glass in the nave was made by Randi Fisher and Ralph Bergholtz.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Ausås Church

The Ausås church was opened in 1858 on the site of a former church. The older church probably dates back to the 13th century, as does the current steeple. The current altarpiece was created in 1949 by Gunnar Wallentin. The sandstone Baptismal font has been dated to around the12th century.
Founded: 1858 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Höja Church

Höja Church was built to the Neo-Gothic style in 1880-1882. The font, made of sandstone, date from the 13th century and Monumental brass from the 17th century. The altarpiece was painted by J. Liljedahl in 1792.
Founded: 1880-1882 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Starby Church

The original church of Starby was made of brick around 1200. In the 15th century the roof got its arches and in 1737 the decayed belfry was replaced with a new one. The current tower and main restoration was made in 1818-1819 and it was enlarged in 1854-1855. The pulpit is probably made in 1668. The altarpiece dates from 1831 and is painted by Alexander Malmkvist. The original medieval font was removed in 1819, but broug ...
Founded: ca. 1200 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Össjö Castle

The current main building of Össjö Castle was built in 1814 after the previous was destroyed by fire. The two wings, dating from 1766 and 1770s survived from the fire. The Össjö history dates from the 16th century, when it belonged to the powerful Danish Krabbe family. Today it is privately owned and not open to the public.
Founded: 1814 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Hjärnarp Church

Neo-classical Hjärnarp stone church built in 1842-1843, replacing a 12th century church. Some of the inventory from the old church has been preserved: a 13th Century Baptismal font, a 17th century brass basin, and a pulpit from 1619. During restoration work in 1957, a fresco by Per Siegård, "Jesus' Passion Week", was added.
Founded: 1842-1844 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.