Top Historic Sights in Ängelholm, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Ängelholm

Ängelholm Church

Luntertun, the old town at the mouth of the River Rönne å, features the ruins of the medieval predecessor of Ängelholm church. The only fixture from Luntertun is the church tower from 1470. The present church was built in 1868, and the interior is from 1941. Altar screen and stained glass have been made by Torsten Nordberg.
Founded: 1868 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Ängelholm Old Town Hall

The lovely old town hall from 1775 in the main square today houses the tourist information. It became too small for the town in 1896.
Founded: 1775 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Munka Ljungby Church

Munka Ljungby Church was probably built in the 12th Century by the monks of Herrevadkloster, who owned large tracts of land, including parts of Munka Ljungby, the name meaning Ljungby of the monks. The transepts date from the 1860s. The altarpiece is a copy of a painting by the 17th century artist Rubens.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Vegeholm Castle

Vegeholm Castle was first built as a danish castle in the early 16th century, and was burned in 1525. It was rebuilt again in 1630 by the Danish Tyge Krabbe. It was owned by his family until 1663, when it was bought by Gustaf Otto Stenbock. After his death it was first possessed by Olof Nilsson Engelholm and thereafter by Johan Cedercrantz. His family owned Vegeholm Castle until 1814 when it was thoroughly renovated. It c ...
Founded: 16th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Barkåkra Church

Barkåkra Church was originally built in the 12th century. It was fully restored in the 19th century. The older pieces, including the Baptismal font, are from the early 12th century. The retable by David Jastro dates from the 18th Century. The painted glass in the nave was made by Randi Fisher and Ralph Bergholtz.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Ausås Church

The Ausås church was opened in 1858 on the site of a former church. The older church probably dates back to the 13th century, as does the current steeple. The current altarpiece was created in 1949 by Gunnar Wallentin. The sandstone Baptismal font has been dated to around the12th century.
Founded: 1858 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Höja Church

Höja Church was built to the Neo-Gothic style in 1880-1882. The font, made of sandstone, date from the 13th century and Monumental brass from the 17th century. The altarpiece was painted by J. Liljedahl in 1792.
Founded: 1880-1882 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Starby Church

The original church of Starby was made of brick around 1200. In the 15th century the roof got its arches and in 1737 the decayed belfry was replaced with a new one. The current tower and main restoration was made in 1818-1819 and it was enlarged in 1854-1855. The pulpit is probably made in 1668. The altarpiece dates from 1831 and is painted by Alexander Malmkvist. The original medieval font was removed in 1819, but broug ...
Founded: ca. 1200 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Össjö Castle

The current main building of Össjö Castle was built in 1814 after the previous was destroyed by fire. The two wings, dating from 1766 and 1770s survived from the fire. The Össjö history dates from the 16th century, when it belonged to the powerful Danish Krabbe family. Today it is privately owned and not open to the public.
Founded: 1814 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Hjärnarp Church

Neo-classical Hjärnarp stone church built in 1842-1843, replacing a 12th century church. Some of the inventory from the old church has been preserved: a 13th Century Baptismal font, a 17th century brass basin, and a pulpit from 1619. During restoration work in 1957, a fresco by Per Siegård, "Jesus' Passion Week", was added.
Founded: 1842-1844 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Czocha Castle

Czocha Castle is located on the Lake Leśnia, what is now the Polish part of Upper Lusatia. Czocha castle was built on gneiss rock, and its oldest part is the keep, to which housing structures were later added.

Czocha Castle began as a stronghold, on the Czech-Lusatian border. Its construction was ordered by Wenceslaus I of Bohemia, in the middle of the 13th century (1241–1247). In 1253 castle was handed over to Konrad von Wallhausen, Bishop of Meissen. In 1319 the complex became part of the dukedom of Henry I of Jawor, and after his death, it was taken over by another Silesian prince, Bolko II the Small, and his wife Agnieszka. Origin of the stone castle dates back to 1329.

In the mid-14th century, Czocha Castle was annexed by Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia. Then, between 1389 and 1453, it belonged to the noble families of von Dohn and von Kluks. Reinforced, the complex was besieged by the Hussites in the early 15th century, who captured it in 1427, and remained in the castle for unknown time (see Hussite Wars). In 1453, the castle was purchased by the family of von Nostitz, who owned it for 250 years, making several changes through remodelling projects in 1525 and 1611. Czocha's walls were strengthened and reinforced, which thwarted a Swedish siege of the complex during the Thirty Years War. In 1703, the castle was purchased by Jan Hartwig von Uechtritz, influential courtier of Augustus II the Strong. On August 17, 1793, the whole complex burned in a fire.

In 1909, Czocha was bought by a cigar manufacturer from Dresden, Ernst Gutschow, who ordered major remodelling, carried out by Berlin architect Bodo Ebhardt, based on a 1703 painting of the castle. Gutschow, who was close to the Russian Imperial Court and hosted several White emigres in Czocha, lived in the castle until March 1945. Upon leaving, he packed up the most valuable possessions and moved them out.

After World War II, the castle was ransacked several times, both by soldiers of the Red Army, and Polish thieves, who came to the so-called Recovered Territories from central and eastern part of the country. Pieces of furniture and other goods were stolen, and in the late 1940s and early 1950s, the castle was home to refugees from Greece. In 1952, Czocha was taken over by the Polish Army. Used as a military vacation resort, it was erased from official maps. The castle has been open to the public since September 1996 as a hotel and conference centre. The complex was featured in several movies and television series. Recently, the castle has been used as the setting of the College of Wizardry, a live action role-playing game (LARP) that takes place in their own universe and can be compared to Harry Potter.