Top Historic Sights in Skurup, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Skurup

Svaneholm Castle

Svaneholm Castle (Svaneholms slott) was initially erected in the 1530s by the Danish knight and royal advisor Mourids Jepsen Sparre. Original murder-holes in the oldest castle walls are still preserved. During the Middle Ages the residence was called Skurdorp (Skudrup), which was fortified and situated next to the parish church, where remains still can be seen. During the mid-15th century it was owned by guardsman Hennin ...
Founded: 1530's | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Västra Vemmenhög Church

The beautiful granite tower, which was built by the parishioners, was completed in 1812. Nothing remains of the old church that originated from the 13th century. It was torn down and replaced by the present church in 1868. The Church of Västra Vemmenhög is beautifully situated on a hill. The altarpiece was made in 1618 and the cruficix dates from the 15th century. The church bell was made in 1793.
Founded: 1812 | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Svenstorp Church

The present Svenstorp Church was built between 1850-1854 to the site of previous church. The tower, dating from 1542, is the oldest part of the church. There are some artefacts from the 17th and 18th centuries.
Founded: 1850-1854 | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Näsbyholm Castle

Näsbyholm Castle was known since the 14th century as a fortified manor house. The current main building corps de logis was erected 1957 on the old castle land lot, a castle that was demolished 1865.
Founded: 1957 | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Östra Vemmenhög Church

The original Östra (East) Vemmenhög church was built in the 1100s. The chapel was added in 1580 for many of the near Dybäck castle owners are buried there. The church was enlarged in 1743 and got its present appearance in 1860. The font, made of sandstone, date from the 12th century.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Gärdslöv Church

Gärdslöv Church was built in the 12th century. The tower dates from 1836 and current sacristy from 1836. The font was made of sandstone in the 1100s. The pulpit, altar and crucifix originate from the 1600s.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.