Svaneholm Castle

Skurup, Sweden

Svaneholm Castle (Svaneholms slott) was initially erected in the 1530s by the Danish knight and royal advisor Mourids Jepsen Sparre. Original murder-holes in the oldest castle walls are still preserved.

During the Middle Ages the residence was called Skurdorp (Skudrup), which was fortified and situated next to the parish church, where remains still can be seen. During the mid-15th century it was owned by guardsman Henning Meyenstorp (Meinstrup) and through marriage it later came to the possession of the Sparre-family. Approximately 1530 the residence was moved from Skurup to an islet in the Lake Svaneholmssjön, after that it was called Svaneholm. Through inheritance and purchase Svaneholm Castle came to the possession of Prebend Gyllenstierna in 1611.

At the death of his great-grandson Axel Gyllenstierna in 1705, the castle went to the nephew Axel Julius Coyet via testament, but 1723 his aunt Sofie Gyllenstiernagained half of the properties via trial. Her half was 1751 bought by baron Gustaf Julius Coyet. 1782 it was inherited by Coyet's nephew, baron Rutger Maclean — "The reformer of Scanian agriculture". At Maclean's death in 1816, Svaneholm Castle was inherited by his nephew Kjell Christoffer Bennet and his three siblings, 1839 it was sold to chamberlain Carl Johan Hallenborg and belonged to his son and grandchild until 1902 when it was redeemed bycount Carl Augustin Ehrensvärd, married to a Miss Hallenborg.

A year after the death of Ehrensvärd in 1934, Svaneholm Castle, the park, the garden, most of the lake and the surrounding forest was purchased by the Svaneholm Castle Cooperative Society. The castle now houses a museum run by Wemmenhög Hundred's Momuments and Home District Society.

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Address

Svaneholm 21, Skurup, Sweden
See all sites in Skurup

Details

Founded: 1530's
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Laurent Broschatt (3 years ago)
Very nice castle. The buffet in the restaurant is very delicious!
Sze Yee Ong (3 years ago)
The food was excellent! And it's in a real castle.
Giorgio Berardi (3 years ago)
We decided to follow the signs to Svaneholm on a hunch, and we did not regret the detour, even though we decided to stay just in the surrounding grounds and on the lakeshore. The park around the castle is very well-kept and the quiet nature is all to be enjoyed. Lovely.
Ian S. Bolton (3 years ago)
Great location
Sophie Peckel (4 years ago)
Interesting castle with very varied collection ranging from flint axe heads to clothing and furniture from the last century and a little wink to Downton Abbey. Great place to walk around in the parc. Also possible to hire a boat and go on the pond.
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