Top Historic Sights in Strängnäs, Sweden

Explore the historic highlights of Strängnäs

Roggeborgen

Roggeborgen was a residence of Strängnäs bishop since 1626. The building was constructed by bishop Kort Rogge (1479-1501) in the late 1400s. Between 1626 and 1930 it functioned as a Gymnasium. Today it is a library including 70000 old articles from the episcopate of Strängnäs.
Founded: c. 1479 | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Strängnäs Cathedral

Strängnäs Cathedral is built mainly of bricks in the characteristic Scandinavian Brick Gothic style. The original church was built of wood, probably during the first decades of the 12th century, on a spot where pagan rituals used to take place and where the missionary Saint Eskil was killed during the mid 11th century. The wooden church was not rebuilt in stone and bricks until 1296, just after Strängnäs became a dioc ...
Founded: 1296-1334 | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Mälsåker Castle

The history of Mälsåker palace stretches back to the Middle Ages when it probably was a simple stone house. During Sweden’s period as a great power in Europe in the 17th century the palace was owned by the Soop family. The famous architect Nikodemus Tessin was engaged to alter the building into one of the grandest baroque palaces in Sweden. The house was extended, wings and a terrace with stairs facing the see were ad ...
Founded: 1660s | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Härad Church

The first stone church in Härad was completed in the late 1100s. The choir was added in 1400s and tower in 16265. The church was enlarged in 1760 with a transept. The most notable inventory is a sandstone reliquary, made in Gotland around 1180. The font dates from the 1200s and crucifix from 1300s.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Tynnelsö Castle

Tynnelsö estate was first mentioned in 1282. Since 1306 it belonged to the Diocese of Strängnäs. During the 1490s bishop Kort Rogge built the first stone castle and the first floor is still the original. In 1522 Tynnelsö was acquired by Gustav Vasa and it belonged to the royal family until 1636, but was again later returned to the crown (during the Great Reduction in 1681). The current square-formed castle was built t ...
Founded: 1590s | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Vårfruberga Abbey Ruins

Vårfruberga Abbey, previously Fogdö Abbey was a Cistercian nunnery from the 12th century until 1527. In the 12th century a house of Benedictine nuns was established in Fogdö, but its exact location is obscure. Excavations in 1991–92 revealed that a medieval fortification had been built on an elevation near the water, and it is possible that the nuns were displaced from their original place of settlem ...
Founded: 1289 | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Vansö Church

The oldest parts of Vansö Church were built in the end of 12th century. It was enlarged to east in the 14th century and again around 1450. The tower cap was demolished in 1765 and rebuilt 1901-1902. The interior consists of a medieval altarpiece (1400s), crucifix (1270-1300), font (c. 1300) and two reliquaries (1400s). Vaults were decorated with murals in the 1460s.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Fogdö Church

Fogdö Church was built in the 1100s and has wooden sculptures from that time. There was a Benedictine nunnery from 1233. The church was used both as a parish church and as a monastic one, as is testified by an inset opening in the south wall - a so-called 'nun"s window' ('nunneporten'). The quire was also widened so as better to accommodate the nuns" choral liturgy. Judging from the surv ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Aspö Church

The tower and northern wall are the oldest parts of Aspö Church (dating from the 12th century). The chancel was completed in 1300s and the church was enlarged in 1400s. It has an interesting inventory; the fine iron-made door between nave and porch dates from the original church, font is from 1200s and the large altar triptych from 1472. There is also a runestone from the 1000s in the church porch.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Strängnäs, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.