Strängnäs Cathedral

Strängnäs, Sweden

Strängnäs Cathedral is built mainly of bricks in the characteristic Scandinavian Brick Gothic style. The original church was built of wood, probably during the first decades of the 12th century, on a spot where pagan rituals used to take place and where the missionary Saint Eskil was killed during the mid 11th century. The wooden church was not rebuilt in stone and bricks until 1296, just after Strängnäs became a diocese. The cathedral was probably inaugurated by bishop Styrbjörn in 1334.

The oldest murals date from the 14th century. The Strängnäs Cathedral was enlarged in several phases during the 15th century and it was damaged by fire in 1473. Bishop Kort Rogge (1479-1501) donated two crucifixes which are still located in the cathedral. The larger one is made in Brussels around 1490. There are also many other significant medieval artefacts in the cathedral. The cathedral contains also the burials of Charles IX of Sweden and Maria of Palatinate-Simmern.

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Details

Founded: 1296-1334
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anders Gränsmark (2 years ago)
Historiskt intressant ställe men oerhört dåliga på att bevaka rikaregalier. Och vad gjorde dessa regalier där från början? Klantigt
swati premachandran (2 years ago)
It's a very nice and cozy looking cathedral! And it is located in a great place!
aldy martir (2 years ago)
It is a good place, come and take a look around
jan oriwohl (2 years ago)
Nice to see :) very impressive for not a big city
Mattias Ericson (3 years ago)
Impressive church with a great historical significance
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