Top Historic Sights in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland

Explore the historic highlights of Kreuzlingen

Seeburg Castle

The site of current Seeburg castle was mentioned first time in 740 AD. The construction of current castle was started in the 11th century (around 1036). It was largely extended by Wichmann von Seeburg, later Archbishop of Magdeburg (1115-1192). The next renovations took place in the 14th and 15th centuries, when the castle was flanked by towers and a gatehouse under the rule of Counts of Mansfeld. Later Seeburg was l ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Kreuzlingen, Switzerland

Kreuzlingen Abbey

Kreuzlingen Abbey was founded in about 1125 by Ulrich I of Dillingen, Bishop of Constance, as a house of Augustinian Canons. In 1144 Pope Lucius II, and in 1145 Emperor Frederick Barbarossa took the monastery under their protection. Kreuzlingen became an Imperial abbey. The abbots, now Imperial prelates, were territorial lords of the small lordship of Hirschlatt north of Friedrichshafen, and this was also their p ...
Founded: c. 1125 | Location: Kreuzlingen, Switzerland

Bernegg Castle

The name Bernegg was first mentioned in 1292. Around 1365 the estate was managed by Heinrich Gottschalk. According to unconfirmed documents, the house was looted by the Confederates in 1499 and then rebuilt. In 1702, the Bernegg passed into the possession of Johann Ulrich Merhart-Mallenbrey. To this day, Merhart family still owns the house. In 1786, Maximilian Christof von Rodt, Bishop of Constance, built the four-st ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Kreuzlingen, Switzerland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.