The site of current Seeburg castle was mentioned first time in 740 AD. The construction of current castle was started in the 11th century (around 1036). It was largely extended by Wichmann von Seeburg, later Archbishop of Magdeburg (1115-1192). The next renovations took place in the 14th and 15th centuries, when the castle was flanked by towers and a gatehouse under the rule of Counts of Mansfeld.

Later Seeburg was left to decay until the Counts of Ingenheim sold it in 1880 to the Wendenburg family. In 1923, Erich Wendenburg commissioned the architect Paul Schultze-Naumburg to completely restore the building in neo-Gothic style.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Storm Shadown (2 months ago)
Beautiful place greate food excellent view from balcony on lake really quiet.
Ananya Biswas (3 months ago)
Expensive but good ambience
Streit Barbara (4 months ago)
First Class
Juan Jaime (13 months ago)
We are here for brunch ( 40fr! ) : Cons : -cafe , water , Prosecco : yes but EXTRA PAYING ! - no music - only 5 tables full and 10 empty , and the 5 tables full all together ! One next to another ! No privacy -it is a castle from outside and from inside it just look as a normal restaurant - no omelets Pros : -good and fresh food -nice personal -clean tables -cookers came to the table to ask about the taste of the food Would I come back? No.
Marion von Burg Messmer (20 months ago)
Nice ambiance and a great view over the lake constance from the terrace. The castle has a beautiful park. I like this historical place.
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