Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Sweden

Gamla Stan

Gamla Stan, The Old Town, consists primarily of the island Stadsholmen. The town dates back to the 13th century, and consists of medieval alleyways, cobbled streets, and archaic architecture. North German architecture has had a strong influence in the Old Town's construction. Gamla Stan is one of the best preserved old towns in Northern Europe. The center of Gamla Stan is Stortorget, the scenic large square, which is sur ...
Founded: | Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Gustav Adolf Square

Gustaf Adolf's square is a located in central Gothenburg. It was named Stortorget (the Big square) until 1854 when a statue was raised over the founding father of Gothenburg, king Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden. Surrounding the square you can find Gothenburg City Hall, the law court (by Gunnar Asplund), and the main canal of Gothenburg. The City Hall is designed by Bengt Wilhelm Carlberg and completed in 1759. The former st ...
Founded: | Location: Gothenburg, Sweden

Gamla Byn

Gamla Byn is the oldest and well-preserved neighborhood of Avesta village. There were iron forges already in the 14th century. The current industrial environment and old houses dates from the 1630s.
Founded: 1630s | Location: Avesta, Sweden

Norrboda Village

Norrboda is a small historical village. It contains of two farms with total of 30 rural buildings, oldest of them dating from the 17th century.
Founded: 17th century | Location: Rättvik, Sweden

Brunsbo Village

The Brunsbo Storäng a few kilometres from Skara is one of this country's largest medieval haying fields. Once there was a village here and the archaeologists have found traces of farming from the early Iron Age down through the Viking and Middle Ages. The ground was farmed differently in different eras, making it possible to locate cattle trails and ancient monuments. Brunnsbo country estate was acquired by the Skar ...
Founded: | Location: Skara, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château des Ducs de Bretagne

The Château des ducs de Bretagne (Castle of the Dukes of Brittany) is a large castle located in Nantes. It served as the centre of the historical province of Brittany until its separation in 1941. It was the residence of the Dukes of Brittany between the 13th and 16th centuries, subsequently becoming the Breton residence of the French Monarchy. Today the castle houses the Nantes History Museum.

The restored edifice now includes the new Nantes History Museum, installed in 32 of the castle rooms. The museum presents more than 850 objects of collection with the aid of multimedia devices. The castle and the museum try to offer a modern vision of the heritage by presenting the past, the present and the future of the city. Night-time illuminations at the castle further reinforce the revival of the site. The 500-metre round walk on the fortified ramparts provides views not just of the castle buildings and courtyards but also of the town.