Medieval castles in Castile and León

Monasterio de Rodilla Castle

The castle of Monasterio de Rodilla was built around 884 AD by Count Diego Porcelos to protect the new territories to be settled. The castle is documented for the first time in 1011. From 1035-1054 the castle was owned by Navarra.
Founded: 9th century AD | Location: Monasterio de Rodilla, Spain

Torregalindo Castle Ruins

Torregalindo castle was mentioned first time in 11th centur when Kingdom of Castile populated the area. Today it lies in ruins above the village.
Founded: 11th century | Location: Torregalindo, Spain

Corullón Castle

Corullón Castle dates from 15th century. Its tower was copied to build a similar one in Tuscany (Italy). Today, the tower and the surrounding ruins are still preserved. The best place which has been preserved is the Tower of Homage. On its entry point, two armorial bearings mark both houses, Osorio´s House and Valcarce´s House. It is a squared tower with three storeys, separated by imposts, battlements, modillions, me ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Corullón, Spain

Serón de Nágima Castle

The Raya or frontier between the kingdoms of Castile and Aragón was fortified with a system of castles and walled-cities that were useful during the several conflicts that took place in the late Middle Ages. The Serón de Nágima castle defended the communication road between the axis of the Jalón river valley, which flows into the Ebro, and Duero valley. Its uniqueness stems from the fact that it is one of the few for ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Serón de Nágima, Spain

Cabrejas del Pinar Castle

The walled medieval town of Cabrejas del Pinar was the leader of its Community of Burgs and Land and there are some traces left of the walled enclosure and fortress that protected the locals. The castle was built in stone on top of a high rock possibly between the 13th and 14th century. Some of the walls, doors and the keep are still visible which helps understand how the fortress’ layout once was. The quadrangular kee ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Cabrejas del Pinar, Spain

Villagarcía de Campos Castle

Villagarcía de Campos Castle was first time mentioned in 1336. In 1810 the castle was ravaged by the French Army during the War of Independence.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Villagarcía de Campos, Spain

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.