Medieval castles in Galicia

Sandiás Castle

Probably built in the first half of the 12th century (although some legends say it was built in the 9th century), Sandiás Castle was located over a castrum (Celtic settlement). It participated in the Portugal secession wars (12th century). In 1386 it was assaulted by the duke of Lancaster, pretender to the Castile crown. In the 15th century it was demolished by a popular riot, and rebuilt later. It was a meeting point fo ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Sandiás, Spain

Castroverde Castle

Castroverde Castle was probably built in the 14th century. Today the 20m high tower exists.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Castroverde, Spain

Maside Castle

Maside Castle was built in the 12th century and restored in the 19th century. The well-preserved castle cannot be visited.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Pantón, Spain

Pazo de Tovar Castle

The tower of Pazo de Tovar was erected in the late 13th century. D. Antonio de Tovar constructed the residential castle around in the early 1500s. Today it hosts exhibitions.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Santo Adrao de Lourenzá, Spain

Mens Castle

Torres de Mens was built in the 15th century by the Moscoso family. The castle consists of an L-shaped domestic building surrounded by a circular enclosure, and it is protected by 3 square towers. Entrance to the inner yard is made through a pointed arch gate in one of the towers. Torres de Mens Castle is a private property, and only its exterior can be visited.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Mens, Spain

Tebra Castle

Tebra Castle is sited in the Tomiño valley. The river Tebra, tributary of the Miño, flows through this valley. Alonso Gómez Churruchao was the owner in 1345, but Pedro Álvarez de Soutomaior took possession of the Castle in 1468. Between 1481 and 1486, Don Fernando de Acuña, on behalf of the Catholic Monarchs, (Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile), destroyed the castle and later it belonged to Alvaro Suar ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Tomiño, Spain

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Craigmillar Castle

Craigmillar is one of Scotland’s most perfectly preserved castles. It began as a simple tower-house residence. Gradually, over time, it developed into a complex of structures and spaces, as subsequent owners attempted to improve its comfort and amenity. As a result, there are many nooks and crannies to explore.

The surrounding gardens and parkland were also important. The present-day Craigmillar Castle Park has fascinating reminders of the castle’s days as a rural retreat on the edge of Scotland’s capital city.

At the core lies the original, late-14th-century tower house, among the first of this form of castle built in Scotland. It stands 17m high to the battlements, has walls almost 3m thick, and holds a warren of rooms, including a fine great hall on the first floor.

‘Queen Mary’s Room’, also on the first floor, is where Mary is said to have slept when staying at Craigmillar. However, it is more likely she occupied a multi-roomed apartment elsewhere in the courtyard, probably in the east range.

Sir Simon Preston was a loyal supporter of Queen Mary, whom she appointed as Provost of Edinburgh. In this capacity, he was her host for her first night as a prisoner, at his townhouse in the High Street, on 15 June 1567. She was taken to Lochleven Castle the following day.

The west range was rebuilt after 1660 as a family residence for the Gilmour family.

The 15th-century courtyard wall is well preserved, complete with gunholes shaped like inverted keyholes. Ancillary buildings lie within it, including a private family chapel.