Medieval castles in Galicia

Sandiás Castle

Probably built in the first half of the 12th century (although some legends say it was built in the 9th century), Sandiás Castle was located over a castrum (Celtic settlement). It participated in the Portugal secession wars (12th century). In 1386 it was assaulted by the duke of Lancaster, pretender to the Castile crown. In the 15th century it was demolished by a popular riot, and rebuilt later. It was a meeting point fo ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Sandiás, Spain

Castroverde Castle

Castroverde Castle was probably built in the 14th century. Today the 20m high tower exists.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Castroverde, Spain

Maside Castle

Maside Castle was built in the 12th century and restored in the 19th century. The well-preserved castle cannot be visited.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Pantón, Spain

Pazo de Tovar Castle

The tower of Pazo de Tovar was erected in the late 13th century. D. Antonio de Tovar constructed the residential castle around in the early 1500s. Today it hosts exhibitions.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Santo Adrao de Lourenzá, Spain

Mens Castle

Torres de Mens was built in the 15th century by the Moscoso family. The castle consists of an L-shaped domestic building surrounded by a circular enclosure, and it is protected by 3 square towers. Entrance to the inner yard is made through a pointed arch gate in one of the towers. Torres de Mens Castle is a private property, and only its exterior can be visited.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Mens, Spain

Tebra Castle

Tebra Castle is sited in the Tomiño valley. The river Tebra, tributary of the Miño, flows through this valley. Alonso Gómez Churruchao was the owner in 1345, but Pedro Álvarez de Soutomaior took possession of the Castle in 1468. Between 1481 and 1486, Don Fernando de Acuña, on behalf of the Catholic Monarchs, (Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile), destroyed the castle and later it belonged to Alvaro Suar ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Tomiño, Spain

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.