Medieval castles in Galicia

Sandiás Castle

Probably built in the first half of the 12th century (although some legends say it was built in the 9th century), Sandiás Castle was located over a castrum (Celtic settlement). It participated in the Portugal secession wars (12th century). In 1386 it was assaulted by the duke of Lancaster, pretender to the Castile crown. In the 15th century it was demolished by a popular riot, and rebuilt later. It was a meeting point fo ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Sandiás, Spain

Castroverde Castle

Castroverde Castle was probably built in the 14th century. Today the 20m high tower exists.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Castroverde, Spain

Maside Castle

Maside Castle was built in the 12th century and restored in the 19th century. The well-preserved castle cannot be visited.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Pantón, Spain

Pazo de Tovar Castle

The tower of Pazo de Tovar was erected in the late 13th century. D. Antonio de Tovar constructed the residential castle around in the early 1500s. Today it hosts exhibitions.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Santo Adrao de Lourenzá, Spain

Mens Castle

Torres de Mens was built in the 15th century by the Moscoso family. The castle consists of an L-shaped domestic building surrounded by a circular enclosure, and it is protected by 3 square towers. Entrance to the inner yard is made through a pointed arch gate in one of the towers. Torres de Mens Castle is a private property, and only its exterior can be visited.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Mens, Spain

Tebra Castle

Tebra Castle is sited in the Tomiño valley. The river Tebra, tributary of the Miño, flows through this valley. Alonso Gómez Churruchao was the owner in 1345, but Pedro Álvarez de Soutomaior took possession of the Castle in 1468. Between 1481 and 1486, Don Fernando de Acuña, on behalf of the Catholic Monarchs, (Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile), destroyed the castle and later it belonged to Alvaro Suar ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Tomiño, Spain

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.