Medieval churches in Sweden

Marka Church

The Romanescue style Marka Church was built in the late 1100s or early 1200s. The sacristy was added later in the Middle Ages. The original tower was demolished in 1750 and the new wooden belfry was completed in 1752. The great bell date from the year 1583 and the small one from 1751. The altarpiece date from the late 17th century as well as the Baroque-style pulpit.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Falköping, Sweden

Svartrå Church

Svartrå church. One of Halland’s most beautiful churches, was probably built in the late 12th century. It was enlarged in the 1th century and the new chapel was added in 1757. The wooden belfry was added in 1772. The interior is characterized from the 18th century with beautiful Rococo roof paintings. The oldest item is a font made around 1200. The tabernacle date from the 16th century.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Falkenberg, Sweden

Asige Church

Asige church was probably built during the 12th century but has been extended and rebuilt until 1890. The interior is characterized by Neoclassicism. The triumph crucifix date from the 1200s, the rest of interior is date from the 19th century.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Slöinge, Sweden

Teda Church

Teda Church was originally built around the year 1200 and enlarged strongly about 100 years later. The star-shape vaulting was made in the 1500s. The mural paintings were made in two phases in the early 1600s. The chapel was addded in 1680s for Arvid Ivarsson Natt och Dag. The oldest item in the church is a font made in the Middle Ages. There is a date 1644 carved to the pulpit. The organs and benches date from the 18th ...
Founded: ca. 1200 | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Valö Church

The greystone church of Valö was built in the late 1300s and renovated in the next century. This is a fascinating church to visit, since it has scarcely been altered structurally since the Middle Ages, and contains much interesting inventory from before the Reformation. This includes a processional crucifix from the 15th century and several medieval sculptures. There is also a fine medieval triptych, unusual for a ch ...
Founded: late 1300s | Location: Östhammar, Sweden

Vika Church

Vika Church was built partially in the 13th century and mainly reconstructed to the late Gothic appearance in the late 1400s. The church includes frescos from the 16th century with motifs taken from the Gospels. It also contains carved statues in wood from the 13th and 15th centuries. The 16th century baptismal font is a copy of the one in Storkyrkan (Stockholm Cathedral).
Founded: 13th century | Location: Falun, Sweden

Skårby Church

‎Skårby Church was built in the mid-1100s. The first record of donations for the new church was dated to 1145. The medieval construction is well-preserved, only small changes and additions have been made between 1300s-1500s and in the early 1700s. The interior is covered with significant mural paintings. The bleacher date from the 17th century, the altar was made by Matthias Stenberg in 1734 and the pulpit was ...
Founded: ca. 1150 | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Västra Nöbbelöv Church

The Church of Västra Nöbbelöv originates from the 12th century. Some parts were added in the 19th century. The church is known for its unique acoustic resonators. The frescoes painted in the 14th century are also an interesting detail. The Västra Nöbbelöv Runestone, listed as DR 278 in the Rundata catalog, is located to the churchyard.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Skivarp, Sweden

Sjörup Old Church

The old church of Sjörup waas built between 1150-1170 by “stone master Carl”. The tower and sacristy were added around 1270. The church was left to decay in the 19th century when it was noted to be too small. The restoration was started in 20th century. There is a rune stone called Sjörupstenen in the churchyard, dating from the 10th century.
Founded: 1150-1170 | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Barkåkra Church

Barkåkra Church was originally built in the 12th century. It was fully restored in the 19th century. The older pieces, including the Baptismal font, are from the early 12th century. The retable by David Jastro dates from the 18th Century. The painted glass in the nave was made by Randi Fisher and Ralph Bergholtz.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Tåssjö Church

The walls of Tåssjö church date probably from the 13th century. It was reconstructed in 1850-1860s. The font, made of sandstone, date from the 13th and pulpit from the 18th century. The altarpiece was donated by council Carl Henrik Roth in 1842. There is also a medieval wooden sculpture, carved probably in the 15th century.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Munka-Ljungby, Sweden

Gödelöv Church

Gödelöv Church was probably built in the 1200s and the tower was added in the next century. The last restoration was made in 1905. The pulpit was made in 1580 and altar also dates from the 16th century. The font, made in the Middle Ages, has been brought from Östra Tunhem church.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Genarp, Sweden

Rolfstorp Church

The nave of Rolfstorp Church was built in the 1200s in Romanesque style. In 17th century the church was enlarged and the current tower was added in 1926. It replaced the earlier wooden belfry. The interior is decorated with medieval mural paintings, dating from from the 14th and 15th centuries.The Baroque-style altarpiece dates from 1655 and is made by master Jonas Abilla. The pulpit was also made in 1655. The stone-made ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Rolfstorp, Sweden

Revinge Church

Revinge Church was built around the year 1200 and enlarged in the 1400s with a tower and porch. There are some mural paintings survived from the Middle Ages. The pulpit was made around 1600. It was painted as brown in 1870, but restored to the original appearance in 1950.
Founded: ca. 1200 | Location: Södra Sandby, Sweden

Barsebäck Church

The nave of Barsebäck Church was built in the 1100s and the tower in 1300s. The church was enlarged in the 15th century. The baptismal font and iron parts of the door date from the original church. The pulpit was probably made in 1637.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Barsebäck, Sweden

Gumlösa Church

According the first written record Gumlösa Church was inaugurated by archbishop Absalon of Lund in 1191. It is the oldest church in the Nordic countries built of brick. The vaulting and the tower were built already to the original church, which has been very unusual. The top of the tower was added in the 14th century. Due the documents there were even 96 relics in Gumlösa church in the Middle Ages. The font, ma ...
Founded: 1191 | Location: Vinslöv, Sweden

Stångby Church

Stångby Church dates from the 12th century and consists of a half-round apsis, nave, choirs and tower. It was rebuilt in the 19th century by C. G. Brunius and the porch was demolished. The tower was erected in 1869-1870 and the middle nave was then enlarged.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Stångby, Sweden

Stora Råby Church

The first stave church in Stora Råby lied probably on the same site as the current one, stone church from the 13th century. The porch and was added in the 1400s and the tower was reconstructed in 1770s. Windows were extended in 1773 and in 1843 C. G. Brunius restored the church. The baptismal font, made of sandstone, dates from the 13th century. The pulpit was made in 1909.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Lund, Sweden

Degeberga Church

Degeberga Church was built in the end of 12th century and it consisted of nave, choir and apse. The tower and vaults were added in the early 1400s. The tower is survived, but the other exterior dates mainly from the restoration made in the 1860s. The unique detail in the church is a pulpit, which was donated to Degeberga already in 1592.
Founded: 12th century | Location: Degeberga, Sweden

Röstånga Church

Röstånga stone church was built around 1200. The small tower was added in 1813 and the church was enlarged in 1832. The medieval porch was replaced with a new one in 1715. Inside the church the sandstone font dates from the Middle ages.
Founded: c. 1200 | Location: Röstånga, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.