Palaces, manors and town halls in Slovenia

Loggia Palace

Loggia Palace is a Venetian palace in Koper and the only preserved Gothic town hall in Slovenia. The earliest part of the existing building dates from 1462, when building work began on a replacement for an earlier Loggia that had stood in the same position on the north side of the main square of Koper, opposite the Praetorian Palace. Following a plague outbreak in Koper in 1553-1555, the facade of the Loggia was embellis ...
Founded: 1462 | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Praetorian Palace

Dominating the southern side of Tito Square is the imposing Praetorian Palace, which has served as the municipal seat for some eight centuries. Its Venetian Gothic design dates from the middle of the 15th century, with the outer staircase and balustrade added fifty years later, and the overall appearance of the façade taking shape in 1664 after significant renovations. After serving various purposes following the d ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Koper, Slovenia

Tivoli Castle

Tivoli Castle is a mansion located in the Ljubljana's Tivoli Park. In the early 15th century, a tower stood in the woods above the site; it was owned by Georg Apfalterer, an ally of Duke Frederick (later Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III). The tower was destroyed by Frederick II, Count of Celje in 1440. The current structure was built in the 17th century atop the ruins of a previous Renaissance-period castle, the mansion ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Betnava Mansion

Betnava estate was first mentioned in 1319, under the name Wintenaw. By the 16th century, it had grown into a fortified and moated renaissance manor. It passed through the hands of numerous owners, including the noble families of Herberstein, Khiessl, Auersperg, Ursini-Rosenberg, Szekely, Brandis in von der Dur. During their tenure, the counts Herberstein transformed it into a Protestant way-station, complete with chapel ...
Founded: 1784 | Location: Maribor, Slovenia

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.