Tivoli Castle is a mansion located in the Ljubljana's Tivoli Park. In the early 15th century, a tower stood in the woods above the site; it was owned by Georg Apfalterer, an ally of Duke Frederick (later Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III). The tower was destroyed by Frederick II, Count of Celje in 1440.

The current structure was built in the 17th century atop the ruins of a previous Renaissance-period castle, the mansion was initially owned by the Jesuits, but came into the possession of the Diocese of Ljubljana following the 1773 suppression of the Jesuit order. Used as the bishop's summer residence, it was surrounded with orchards.

In the mid-19th century, it was bought by the Austrian emperor Francis Joseph I, who in 1852 presented it as a gift to the veteran Habsburg marshal Joseph Radetzky. Radetzky renovated the mansion in the Neoclassical style, giving it its present appearance, and spent much of his retirement in it with his wife Francisca von Strassoldo Grafenberg, a local Carniolan noblewoman.

The field marshal Joseph Radetzky von Radetz (1766–1858) contributed a lot to the arrangement of Tivoli Park. There was a full-size cast iron statue of Radetzky on display in Ljubljana on the steps in front of Tivoli Castle from 1882 till 1918. In 1851, it won a prize at the Great Exhibition in London. Today, it is preserved by the City Museum of Ljubljana. The statue's pedestal, however, remains at its original place.

In 1863, the mansion was bought by the Municipality of Ljubljana, who used it as (among other things) a poorhouse, later subdividing it into condominiums. In 1967, it was again renovated and became the venue for the International Centre of Graphic Arts.

In 1864, the Austrian sculptor Anton Dominik Fernkorn created four cast iron dogs, still on display in Tivoli Park in front of Tivoli Castle. The dogs do not have tongues, and it has been falsely rumoured that Fernkorn committed suicide by shooting himself due to this mistake.

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Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Slovenia

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Ilona Zvinska (2 months ago)
Beautiful view from the top, took about 10 minutes to go up walking. Not a difficult hike up unlike all the reviews are saying. Also it is absolutely worth it. We were recommended by the guide not to climb up the bell tower and you get there the same view as at the rest of the tower but to enter you need to pay. Castle entrance is free otherwise. There’s also a cable car if you don’t want to go up walking.
Brent Hofmann (2 months ago)
Nice views of the city. Easy walk, but can be a little steep if you are older or have kids. Muzzle for your dog is required on the funicular. The castle has very nice grounds with a cafe, wine bar, and restaurant. The are many things to see up here. Because of this the castle has a modern feel to it (if you're looking for something more medieval. Very pretty.
Tobi Siegbert (2 months ago)
Beautiful Castle on top of the Hill. We came to play the Castle escape game. Very nice and helpful Multilingual Staff. Prices are reasonable. The place is a bit touristy thou.
sasha roz (3 months ago)
Classic European castle. I recommend to visit because of very peaceful and nice walking tour climbing to the castle from the old city( pretty easy, takes 15-20 min) thruway beautiful green Forrest. Also spectacular view in the city from the cartel. Nice cafeteria to drink coffee and relaxing after the climbing
Grzegorz Marek (3 months ago)
Very enjoyable. Wonderful views of the city. The underground part is partially done in a modern, industrial style. Looks great. There are some cafes and a souvenir shop in the castle, as well as an art gallery.
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