Roman Sites in Montenegro

Budva Roman Baths

Underneath the plateau that borders Budva and in front of the church of Saint John (believed to be originally built in the 7th century), we find the Roman public baths (called terme) hidden from view. Archaeologists who have studied Old Town Budva date these Roman public baths to the 3rd and 4th centuries AD.
Founded: 200-300 AD | Location: Budva, Montenegro

Budva Necropolis

During the digging of the foundations for the hotel “Avala” between 1936 and 1938, several graves from the Hellenic and Roman periods were discovered, together with a lot of precious materials – especially gold and silver jewellery, different dishes, glassware, ceramics, and weapons. The necropolis has two parts, the older one that belongs to the Hellenic period between the 4th and 1st centuries BC, and the newer o ...
Founded: 300 BC | Location: Budva, Montenegro

Adzi-pasa's bridge

The Old Bridge over the Ribnica (Stari most na Ribnici) is the oldest bridge in Podgorica, the capital city of Montenegro. The bridge was built during the period of Roman rule and underwent a major reconstruction in the 18th century AD. The reconstruction was funded by Adži-paša Osmanagić and, since then, the bridge is also known as Adži-paša"s bridge.
Founded: 0-100 AD | Location: Podgorica, Montenegro

Doclea Roman Ruins

Doclea (also Dioclea) was a Roman city, the seat of the Late Roman province of Praevalitana, and an Archbishopric, which is now a Latin Catholic titular see. The Romanized Illyrian tribe known as Docleatae that inhabited the area derived their name from the city. It was the largest settlement of the Docleatae, founded in the first decade of the 1st century AD. Doclea was built to conform to the terrain. It was a large to ...
Founded: 0-100 AD | Location: Podgorica, Montenegro

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.