Soviet occupation memorials in Poland

Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers

The Monument to the fallen Shipyard Workers 1970 (Pomnik Poległych Stoczniowców 1970) was unveiled on 16 December 1980 near the entrance to what was then the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk. It commemorates the 42 or more people killed during the Coastal cities events in December 1970. It was created in the aftermath of the Gdańsk Agreement and is the first monument to the victims of communist oppression to ...
Founded: 1980 | Location: Gdańsk, Poland

Monument to the Victims of December 1970

A monument commemorating the victims of the 1970 strikes which saw militia and army open fire on protestors. The “7” represents one of the fallen strikers being carried by his colleagues and may well be that of Adam Gotner who despite being hit 6 times managed to survive. Unveiled on December 17, 1980 – the tenth anniversary of the strikes and shootings.
Founded: 1980 | Location: Gdynia, Poland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.