Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers

Gdańsk, Poland

The Monument to the fallen Shipyard Workers 1970 (Pomnik Poległych Stoczniowców 1970) was unveiled on 16 December 1980 near the entrance to what was then the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk. It commemorates the 42 or more people killed during the Coastal cities events in December 1970. It was created in the aftermath of the Gdańsk Agreement and is the first monument to the victims of communist oppression to be erected in a communist country. It was designed by Bogdan Pietruszka, Wiesław Szyślak, Wojciech Mokwiński and Jacek Krenz.

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Address

Doki 2, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1980
Category: Statues in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Larry Smith (4 months ago)
A monument to those brave shipyard workers who lost their lives to establish PL first workers Union.
lasse stensson (5 months ago)
If you read ahead about the history, you will then appreciate your visit more.
nock nock (6 months ago)
One of the coolest sightseeings here.
Christopher Brown (7 months ago)
The monument is very tall and impressive to memorialize the 40+ shipyard workers who resisted communist oppression. It is a little out of the way. Stop by if you are near it.
Wujek Klimson (2 years ago)
Monumental.
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