Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers

Gdańsk, Poland

The Monument to the fallen Shipyard Workers 1970 (Pomnik Poległych Stoczniowców 1970) was unveiled on 16 December 1980 near the entrance to what was then the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk. It commemorates the 42 or more people killed during the Coastal cities events in December 1970. It was created in the aftermath of the Gdańsk Agreement and is the first monument to the victims of communist oppression to be erected in a communist country. It was designed by Bogdan Pietruszka, Wiesław Szyślak, Wojciech Mokwiński and Jacek Krenz.

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Address

Doki 2, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1980
Category: Statues in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sean McCurdy (13 months ago)
Interesting history spot about how Walesa began the Soldarnosc "Solidarity" movement.
Roger F (2 years ago)
Impressive monument with remarkable museum.
Giacomo Spagnoli (2 years ago)
An impressive memorial to the fallen workers of the shipyard in 1970, erected in the 1980s at the birthplace of Solidarność (Solidarity).
Tom McClenaghan (2 years ago)
Those of us who remember Lech Walesa and the struggles of the Gdansk Shipyard workers, and the knock-on affect of what they achieved, will find this area fascinating. There is a little bar right at the famous shipyard gate where you can sit and ponder the history of the place and pay tribute to those who fell there in the unrest of 1970.
Michael Irenski (2 years ago)
When we visited Poland I was surprised with how much I enjoyed everything beyond my expectations. Originally, I thought how enjoyable can this be. Man, was I wrong. There is something about history. Reading is one thing but, to be there and seeing, touching is another. To see where it began was a moving experience. Maybe, not to the everyday citizens but, to people who lived through it. History is needed in our lives or we forget and we are doomed to repeat the past.
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