Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers

Gdańsk, Poland

The Monument to the fallen Shipyard Workers 1970 (Pomnik Poległych Stoczniowców 1970) was unveiled on 16 December 1980 near the entrance to what was then the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk. It commemorates the 42 or more people killed during the Coastal cities events in December 1970. It was created in the aftermath of the Gdańsk Agreement and is the first monument to the victims of communist oppression to be erected in a communist country. It was designed by Bogdan Pietruszka, Wiesław Szyślak, Wojciech Mokwiński and Jacek Krenz.

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Address

Doki 2, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 1980
Category: Statues in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wujek Klimson (10 months ago)
Monumental.
Mats Miersen (12 months ago)
Great symbolic
Jeremy Cowan (2 years ago)
Great monument to the bravery of those who stood up for the rights of the workers. Important place in our history.
Ostap Smolynets (2 years ago)
Beautiful monument. Has benches all around so you can have some rest
Royston Hixon (2 years ago)
Fantastic museum amazing how one man started a movement to help his fellow county men and ultimately helped other communist countries release the iron fist
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