Krupa Monastery

Obrovac, Croatia

Krupa monastery is the oldest Orthodox monastery in Croatia. It is located on the southern slopes of the Velebit mountain, halfway between the towns of Obrovac and Knin.

The monastery was built in 1317 by monks from Bosnia, with the financial support from the Serbian king Milutin. During their reigns, King Stefan Dečanski and Emperor Dušan renovated the monastery. In the 15th and 16th centuries, the monastery was endowed by Saint Angelina of Serbia. Georgije Mitrofanović painted the walls in 1620–22. In the 1760s, Serbian writer and educator, Dositej Obradović, lived and worked in Krupa, while in the 1860s, major Serbian realist author, Simo Matavulj, lived and was educated in the monastery. Gerasim Zelić also lived there in the 18th century. It was completely renovated in 1855.

The surrounding konaks were burnt to the ground by the Ustaše during the World War II, who also destroyed the interior of the monastery turning it into their military post. In the 1950s the construction of the large belfry began but was never finished. After the outbreak of the Yugoslav wars in 1991, the well-known monastery treasury was displaced from Krupa. During the Operation Storm the monastery sustained damages in September 1995 and the local Orthodox Serbs, so as the priests, went into exile in Serbia. The belfry and the bells were damaged, so as the chapel while the interior was looted and partially demolished. Since 2000, partial reconstruction of Krupa began. It included numerous works, such as the construction and painting of the small additional church (paraklis) and the partial adaptation of the unfinished belfry. Some of the artifacts were returned in 2010. Since the mid-2010s, the government of the Republic of Croatia also helped with the renovation of the monastery.

The church of the Krupa monastery is dedicated to the Feast of the Dormition of Theotokos. In the monastery there are beautiful frescoes, a valuable collection of icons and parts of iconostasis and the collection of the several centuries old books.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Obrovac, Croatia
See all sites in Obrovac

Details

Founded: 1317
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kamil Kovar (10 months ago)
Very nice place, not much to see but important historical place. Recommend to walk to nearby bridge Kudin most, about 90 min walking along the river with some difficult parts on rocks but very rewarding experience.
Fila “Fila2mad” 2mad (11 months ago)
Beautiful, but lacking some kind of tour inside of buildings.
Anamarija “Apophenia” Partl (12 months ago)
Nice monastery but not clearly marked what you may visit. Wanted to buy candles and such, visit the place but no one was there to give any info.
Sara Valjin (13 months ago)
Very pretty river to be around. There is also a friendly dog who is with you while being there. The river is clean and you can basically wash your hands in it. Once I came here on 1st May and there was literally no place, but all trough the year your almost alone! I love this place ❤️
M. Ban (2 years ago)
Krupa Monastery is located at the bottom of the Velebit mountain, Croatia. It is founded at the 14th century & it's, still, in function. It was devastated through the history many times but, rebuilt as well. Today, it's possible to visit it and enjoy in old library and other sacral values. The Monastery is surrounded by beautiful nature, it is next to the Krupa river well ????
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