St. Nicholas Fortress

Šibenik, Croatia

St. Nicholas' Fortress was built on the left side at the entrance to St. Anthony Channel, on the island called Ljuljevac. The island is situated at the entrance to the Šibenik channel across the Jadrija beach lighthouse. St. Nicholas' Fortress got its name from the Benedictine Monastery of St. Nicholas, which was originally on the island, but due to the construction of the fortress, it had to be demolished. At the request of domestic Croat population of Šibenik, the Venetian captain Alojzije de Canal decided to build a fort on the island of Ljuljevac in 1525. The fortress was designed and built by the famous Venetian architect and builder Hyeronimus di San Michaela. It was built by in the 16th century to prevent Turkish boats from reaching the port. St. Nicholas' Fortress was armed with 32 cannons. However, its imposing appearance and size were a bigger threat to the enemy than cannons ever were.

The fortress is one of the most valuable and best preserved examples of defense architecture in Dalmatia. It is made of brick because that material was considered to be most resistant to cannonballs, while the foundations are made of stone. Although defense capabilities of the fortress have never been tested in military operations, the structure still proved successful in protecting the city from sea-bound enemy attacks. During the centuries of use, the structure served to various armies and has undergone a number of renovations, some of them necessary only because of the development of arms. It was completely abandoned by the military in 1979 and has been undergoing renovation ever since.

St. Nicholas' Fortress was included in UNESCO's World Heritage Site list as part of 'Venetian Works of Defence between 15th and 17th centuries' in 2017. After reconstruction work that lasted for two years, the fortress was open to visitors in July 2019.

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Founded: 1525
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tetiana Tymkiv (13 months ago)
A nice fortress, as appeared later only accessable by the boat, but you can come to the walls and walk on the island nearby.
Ramon Celinger (14 months ago)
Beautiful place for walking and mind cleaning. Also fantastic sunrise. Must see if you are near Brodarica or Sibenik.
Pavel Smetana (14 months ago)
The coolest Šibenik fortress. You need to pay for tour boat, but it's quite nice trip and the fortress is worth it. It's not reconstructed, like the other ones.
Noud Frenken (15 months ago)
Looks great and is accessible on foot but the entrance gate is conveniently locked so to enter you have to book a boat tour to take you to the back side pier entrance.
G (15 months ago)
Nothing special. I walked to the Fortress through the water. You can only see the back of it. So quite useless. But it's worth for a little romantic walk. Except when she falls all the time in the mud and she has to clean her white(!!) shoes (why would you even wear white shoes).
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