Burnum was a Roman Legion camp and town. It is located 2.5 km north of Kistanje. The remains include a praetorium, the foundations of several rooms, the amphitheatre and the aqueduct.

It is assumed that Burnum originates from the year 33 BC, but it is more likely that it was established a few decades later. Several Roman legions were located there in succession, and the first one was Legio XX Valeria Victrix from the beginning of the Pannonian uprising (Bellum Batonianum) in AD 6-9. The reason for its location was the need for the control of traffic around the Krka River. Building was initiated by the Roman governor for Dalmatia Publius Cornelius Dolabella and continued by the Emperor Claudius.

The camp gained its final shape during the reign of Claudius around 50 AD. Legio XI Claudia Pia Fidelis left the camp some time between AD 42 and 67, probably AD 56-57 and was succeeded by Legio IIII Flavia Felix.

According to some sources, a rebellion of Lucius Arruntius Camillus Scribonianus against the emperor Claudius in AD 42 was started at this camp as well. After the last Roman legions had left the camp, it developed into an urban settlement.

The camp was completely destroyed when the emperor Justinian attempted to take it back from the Ostrogoths in the 6th century.

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Address

D59, Kistanje, Croatia
See all sites in Kistanje

Details

Founded: 1st century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

YeapGuy (3 years ago)
Not much to see and no guide to tell you historical information. Waste of money.
Franzi B. (3 years ago)
For 30 kuna you get to see a modern working site where the amphitheater is restored without much love. No information about the history. Were disappointed :(
Dragan Raskovic (3 years ago)
Great historical place to see!
Bertus van Remmerden (4 years ago)
The arches are easily to miss and are restored in the 70’s. It was part of a large main office building for the Romans. 73 by 100 meters. It’s just these 2 arches, nothing more. Impressive.
Miguel de Sá (6 years ago)
Really easy to find. Is more bigger that you can see in the photos
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