Fort Nečven is a medieval Croatian fortress from the 14th century, and one of the most important fortified buildings in Croatia in terms of size and degree of preservation. 

The fort and its associated yard cover a square kilometer. It used to be surrounded by high walls made of small, poorly assembled stones combined with lime. The northeast courtyard wall was separated by a deep moat and perhaps a moving (lifting) bridge from the remains of the fortress. The walls were over a meter thick. The steep southern walls reached a height of up to 15 metres and consisted of five floors. The northern side, where the five-storey ancient square tower stands, is now filled with rubble.

On the other side of Krka, opposite from Nečven, are remnants of another old Croatian city, Trošenj (Čučevo). Those cities were previously connected by a bridge (which was destroyed in 1647 during the war between Don Stjepan Sorić and Krajišnici) that connected central Dalmatia with Bukovica and Ravni Kotari. The bridge was supervised and travellers who passed the border between Šubić's and Nelipić's properties were charged a toll.

The First Lords of Nečven-Nelipić were at the height of their power after the collapse of Mladen Šubić II (1322 AD) when they were named as the major force in the Southern Croatian region by Prince Nelipac.

The Turks ruled Nečven from 1522 to 1678 or 1686, apart from a period between 1648 and 1670 during which it was given to Venetian vassals Šibenik and Trogir, and burned down at the orders of Leonardo Foscolo, using the established constructions they found and the mighty wooden bridge over the river Krka. In their time there lived: the Dizdars, the Aghas, the Begs and the Kadijas), which showed a great deal how important the fort and the city was because it was in effect the seat for administrative and judicial power in that area for that time.

By the end of the 18th century, the fortress lost its strategic importance, and it was abandoned and the surrounding villages depopulated.

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Nečven, Promina, Croatia
See all sites in Promina

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

And E. (4 months ago)
Wonderful view of the Krka and a place of rest. Short walk from the village.
Zoltán Balogh (5 months ago)
The view and the landscape are beautiful! The castle has begun to be renovated, I hope it will continue!
Hana Crvelin (13 months ago)
Nečven grad or Nečven kula Croatian medieval fortress located on the west side of Promina, on the edge of steep cliffs on the left side of the river Krka. Opposite it, on the right bank of the Krka, is the fortress of Trošenj, the town of Šubić. Since the 14th century, the lords of Nečven have been members of the Croatian noble family Nelipić. Nečven, according to legend, was named after a beautiful Nečven girl who refused the requests of the Bribir princes and eventually poisoned herself to avoid such a fate.
Petra Simunec (2 years ago)
Nice to look at
Lana Makovec (2 years ago)
BEAUTIFUL VIEW
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