Venetian Castle

Split, Croatia

The Venetian Castle was built during the 15th century in Split. Built just south-west of the Diocletian's Palace along the shoreline, the castle had an irregular pentagonal shape with three towers facing north and overlooking the city. The decision to build the castle was made in 1424, however, it wasn't until 1441 that it was actually built on the grounds of a demolished monastery. By the early 16th century, the castle was in poor condition and it wasn't until the first half of the 17th century that work on improving it began.

By the early 19th century, the castle had lost its defensive purpose and the southern walls were demolished between 1806 and 1807 on the orders of Auguste de Marmont during the Napoleonic Wars. Presently, what remains of the castle is the large central tower and the smaller eastern tower with the wall connecting them, both located on the Radić Brothers Square (Trg braće Radić).

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Details

Founded: 1441
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Arkadiusz Kościak (2 years ago)
Arkadiusz Kościak (2 years ago)
ERGÜN Atlas (4 years ago)
The seaside and the shops are good quality ... The old city behind the beach is great .. The narrow streets are the history of the disposal .. I am .. It is worth seeing ..
ERGÜN Atlas (4 years ago)
The beach and the shops are of good quality ... The old town behind the beach is great .. The narrow streets are all about history .. I like it .. Worth seeing ..
Awkwarduo Travel (4 years ago)
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