Kamičak Castle

Drniš, Croatia

Kamičak was first mentioned in 1345 in a document issued by the Croato-Hungarian king Ludovik I of Angevin to confirm the property of the castle to Ivan II Nelipić, whose family possessed it at least from the 11th century. According to oral tradition, it is assumed that Petar Svačić (Snačić), the last king of the independent Kingdom of Croatia, killed in the battle of Gvozd Mountain in 1097, was born in Kamičak, since the Nelipić family descended from the Svačić tribe. The last male member of the Nelipić family was Ivaniš (†1434), who gave the castle to his son-in-law Ivan VI Anž Frankopan. The king Sigismund of Luxemburg however did not recognize it and gave the castle to Talovac noble family.

In 1445 Kamičak was given to Grgur/Gregory Utješinović, who donated the island of Visovac to the members of Franciscan Province of Bosna Srebrena. His son, the influential Cardinal Juraj/George Utješinović was born in the castle in 1482.

A couple of years later, the castle belonged to the Halapić brothers, who were present at the election of Croato-Hungarian king Vladislaus II Jagelović in 1490. There are some other people who originate from Kamičak area, for instance Marko Mišljenović, Ban (Viceroy) of Croatia, who ruled 1506–1507.

After conquering Kingdom of Bosnia in 1463, the Ottoman forces increased pressure on Croatian borders all the time, which lead to fall of Kamičak in 1522/1523. The castle was ruined and, having had no importance for the Turks, completely abandoned never to be rebuilt.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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