Château de Bournazel

Bournazel, France

Château de Bournazel was built in the mid-16th century by Jean de Buisson. He replaced the older castle with Renaissance style residence. Today the gardens are added to the List of Remarkable Gardens of France.

Comments

Your name



Address

Rue Noire, Bournazel, France
See all sites in Bournazel

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brian Kennan (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful chateaus that I have visited. The architecture and stonework is exceptional. Extensive renovation under way. Beautiful gardens. The location is out of the way on the outskirts of nowhere and the village is picturesque but has almost nothing going on. Having said that, it's very worthwhile to visit and I will revisit. Perfect destination for a motorcycle day out.
Garry Hardman (3 years ago)
The castle and the surrounding village is a lovely place
Cedric Ramos (4 years ago)
Very good visit, and explanation of the renovation. The guide was very good and the castle is beautiful
Chris Flynn (4 years ago)
A huge amount of effort has been put into renovating the house and gardens. No doubt improvements will continue. Unfortunately the tour guide did not speak English and there is no audio assistance. The English guide book is very short and does not match up to the detailed description given by the guide. We cut our visit short of the house a walked around the gardens. Please provide an audio guide for foreign visitors.
Matthieu B (4 years ago)
A gorgeous castle and its garden. The castle is still under renovation but there are guided tours. Our tour guide was a young lady very passionate about history. We passed by each room of the castle and she commented on the architecture the furniture and the paintings. A very enlightening visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.