Château de Belcastel

Belcastel, France

The Château de Belcastel is situated above the north bank of the Aveyron River, downstream from Rodez. The oldest part of the castle was constructed in the 9th century, and it grew in the hands of the Belcastel family. Later, for many decades, it was the seat of the famed Saunhac family.

The famous French architect Fernand Pouillon (1912-1986) discovered the castle in ruins in 1974. Pouillon decided to reconstruct the fortress, which had been abandoned since at least the 17th century. Pouillon himself undertook the restoration by hand, along with the help of a dozen Algerian stonemasons, and 10 stained-glass experts. The work lasted only eight years and called for great courage from him and his colleagues, due to the size of the undertaking, the castle's dangerous location, and the fact that no machines were used in the daring reconstruction.

The Château de Belcastel remained the private residence of Pouillon until he died in Belcastel on 24 July 1986. In 2005, the two owners of the AFA Gallery in New York purchased the château and opened it to the public as both a gallery and a historical monument.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

edward luscott (2 months ago)
Outside is better than inside.
Trevor Bond (2 months ago)
What a superb place to stop for a drink and an icecream. So friendly and helpful. I will had been there in time for lunch as i am sure it would have been excellent.
Prudence Martin (3 months ago)
Really interesting day out; fully anglicised with an informative guide, both about the history of the castle and its most recent architect. You can take a picnic and eat lunch here- highly recommend with its beautiful setting of Belcastle.
Cozmin Oprea (3 months ago)
Small but intense and charming medieval Village. End the guy with the cristal shop ... amazing!!!
Tim Both (8 months ago)
My wife and I stayed here for 5 wonderful nights. Hosted by Isi we were treated to great conversation, great food and unbeatable hospitality. A once in a lifetime experience.
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