Glenfiddich Distillery

Dufftown, United Kingdom

Glenfiddich is a Speyside single malt Scotch whisky produced by William Grant & Sons in the Scottish burgh of Dufftown in Moray. Glenfiddich means 'valley of the deer' in Scottish Gaelic, which is why the Glenfiddich logo is a stag.

The Glenfiddich Distillery was founded in 1886 by William Grant in Dufftown, Scotland, in the glen of the River Fiddich. The Glenfiddich single malt whisky first ran from the stills on Christmas Day, 1887.

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    Address

    Dufftown, United Kingdom
    See all sites in Dufftown

    Details

    Founded: 1886
    Category:

    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    anthony smith (7 months ago)
    Lovely morning walking around the distillery grounds. Cafe/restaurant open and provided a really quality lunch and very reasonable £. A well stocked bar and very friendly staff. I'D strongly recommend a visit.
    rohit dayama (16 months ago)
    Good COVID19 measures in place. Not a huge variety in the shop but a few decent bottles at every price range. Unfortunately the lounge was fully booked, so no option to try any drams
    rohit dayama (16 months ago)
    Good COVID19 measures in place. Not a huge variety in the shop but a few decent bottles at every price range. Unfortunately the lounge was fully booked, so no option to try any drams
    aliyu ramatu (17 months ago)
    Great place
    Stephen Paulovics (17 months ago)
    Work again thank god
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