Huntly Castle was the ancestral home of the chief of Clan Gordon, Earl of Huntly. Architecturally the castle consists of a well-preserved five-story tower with an adjoining great hall and supporting buildings. Areas of the original ornate facade and interior stonework remain. A mound in the grounds of the castle is all that remains of an earlier 12th century motte. Originally named Strathbogie, the castle was granted to Sir Adam Gordon of Huntly in the 14th century. King Robert the Bruce was a guest of the castle in 1307 prior to his defeat of the Earl of Buchan.

With its splendid architecture, Huntly Castle served as a baronial residence for five centuries. The palace block, erected in between the 16th and 17th centuries, has an impressive L-plan tower house and defensive earthworks from the civil war. The property is famed for the fine heraldic sculpture and inscribed stone friezes and includes two impressive heraldic fireplaces in the Marchioness’s lodging.

Eleven steps lead to the raised area where the castle stands. The castle can be viewed from outside and there is an interpretation board giving information about the property.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rob Kempton (2 years ago)
The outside looks cool but the inside is even better! There are a lot of fun nooks and crannies to explore and the view from the top is stellar!
Dimitris Papakonstantis (2 years ago)
Really nice. One of the best castles I have been. Very well preserved.
James Wood (2 years ago)
Just a ruin but you can feel the history. Really pleasant to wander around the castle and grounds at your own pace. Well worth an hour or two of your time if you're passing. Staff are really friendly and helpful too.
David Schwiertz (2 years ago)
Beautiful old castle with Story background. Love it. And you can try sword and something more. The City is also beautiful and old. Good location to make historic picture. And its in the near of the whisky road. Go visit and have fun by learning about the history.
Jenni Raeside (3 years ago)
Fantastic food. Lovely environment. We sat in the bar this time and enjoyed the fire. Great value for money. Quality of food is very high. Would recommend.
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