The first castle in Głogówek was built by the Piasts from the Opole line probably in the 13th century. In the years 1532-1561, the Zeidlitz family took the castle over from the previous owners; in 1561 it was in possession of the Oppersdorffs. They decided to demolish the Gothic building and replace it with a Renaissance structure which has survived - only with minor transformations - to the present day.

The first project was the upper castle with the duke’s chamber and corner towers (1561-1606); from 1606, the lower castle was developed along with a chapel. In the years 1743-1781, the sough wing of the lower castle was expanded and Baroque detailed were added; in the mid-19th century, part of the castle was rebuilt under the supervision of an architect named Gluck.

During the Swedish invasion in 1655, the castle was home to King Jan Kazimierz and his court, and in 1806 it was visited by Ludwig van Beethoven fleeing from the Napoleon’s army.In 1945 the last member of the Oppersdorff family left the castle which has ever since changed hands and has served different functions: youth hostel, regional museum, art gallery, and culture centre. Today, the building is owned by the municipality again and restoration works are underway.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

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4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gleb Glebov (6 months ago)
Under reconstruction ...
Googl I (16 months ago)
Closed. Under construction.
Katrina Johnson (2 years ago)
Beautiful place
Jelena Z (3 years ago)
Super
ShinigamiChopper (3 years ago)
You Can have a walk in the park, its quite nice.
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