St. Lawrence Church

Głuchołazy, Poland

The Church of St. Lawrence was built in the 13th century, probably only after the foundation of the town in 1250. Construction works could last until the end of the third quarter of the 13th century. As early as 1285, there was a first record of the local priest Rudolf, who then appeared as a witness on the document.

In 1428, the Hussites plundered and burned down the church of which bare walls remained. The reconstruction continued with problems until 1472, when the church was re-consecrated. During it, a new, larger chancel was built.

In 1560, the church was damaged again by a fire, after which its facades were covered with Renaissance decorations (corner bossage) during renovation. The church survived in this condition until 1729-1733, when it was rebuilt in the baroque style at the request of the bishop of Wrocław, Francis Ludwik von Neuenburg. The old nave and the gothic chancel were almost completely rebuilt, the older walls were dismantled and only partially used in new building. In 1841, two early modern helmets were erected by the carpenter Francis Berger on the western towers, and at the same time the front wall between the towers was raised to the height of the crowning cornice. The helmets of the towers were replaced once again at the beginning of the 20th century.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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medievalheritage.eu

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Piotr Grubiak (6 months ago)
Moje doświadczenia z tego miejsca są bardzo głębokie... To jest "mój" piękny, zabytkowy kościół...
Jacek Goj (7 months ago)
Miejsce kultu religijnego :)
Mattipll _ (8 months ago)
Beautiful church, but you can only see through the bars
Wojciech Karcz (8 months ago)
nice interior
maria kmita (9 months ago)
A very nice church
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