The Château d'Ussé stronghold at the edge of the Chinon forest overlooking the Indre Valley was first fortified in the 11th century by the Norman seigneur of Ussé, Gueldin de Saumur, who surrounded the fort with a palisade on a high terrace. The site passed to the Comte de Blois, who rebuilt in stone.

In the 15th century, the ruined castle of Ussé was purchased by Jean V de Bueil, a captain-general of Charles VII who became seigneur of Ussé in 1431 and began rebuilding it in the 1440s; his son Antoine de Bueil married in 1462 Jeanne de Valois, the natural daughter of Charles VII and Agnès Sorel, who brought as dowry 40000 golden écus. Antoine was heavily in debt and in 1455, sold the château to Jacques d’Espinay, son of a chamberlain to the Duke of Brittany and himself chamberlain to the king; Espinay built the chapel, completed by his son Charles in 1612, in which the Flamboyant Gothic style is mixed with new Renaissance motifs, and began the process of rebuilding the 15th-century château that resulted in the 16th-17th century aspect of the structure to be seen today.

In the seventeenth century Louis I de Valentinay, comptroller of the royal household, demolished the north range of buildings in order to open the interior court to the spectacular view over the parterre terrace, to a design ascribed to André Le Nôtre. Valentinay's son-in-law was the military engineer Vauban, who visited Ussé on numerous occasions. Later Ussé passed to the Rohan. In 1802 Ussé was purchased by the duc de Duras; as early as March 1813, low-key meetings were held at Ussé among a group of Bourbon loyalists, who met to sound out the possibilities of a Bourbon Restoration: such men as Trémouille, duc de Fitzjames, the prince de Polignac, Ferrand, Montmorency and the duc de Rochefoucault attended. Here later François-René de Chateaubriand worked on his Mémoires d'Outre-Tombe as the guest of duchesse Claire de Duras.

In 1885 the comtesse de la Rochejaquelein bequeathed Ussé to her great-nephew, the comte de Blacas. Today the château belongs to his descendent. Famed for its picturesque aspect, Ussé was the subject of a French railroad poster issued by the Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléans in the 1920s and was one of several that inspired Walt Disney in the creation of many of the Disney Castles.

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Founded: 1440s
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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ROMAN PAVLIUK (11 months ago)
This is a very beautiful castle!!! I recommend
Pierre Feuillet (11 months ago)
I love this castle located in the little town. I like because it’s little on the hill with a nice view. The”chateau de la belle au bois dormants ”. The parc is pretty , great little walk and the inside is well decorated with mix of art. Easy to park next to the castle. You can visit the chapel too. Nice walk outside the castle to enjoy the view.
Théofania Mavridou (11 months ago)
The fairy tale of the sleeping beauty you can live it here in this castle. Is the castle that inspired the writer to write this beautiful story..
Peter Van Hende (11 months ago)
Ideal to visit with kids. The interiors are also very nice. You can feel people lived here until not so long ago.
Archana Srinivasan (11 months ago)
Beautiful château ! It's worth to go inside if you have kids.... For adults I recommend you get to see the castle from outside....you get an amazing view from the road which is perpendicular to the castle....
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