Rocca Imperiale Castle

Rocca Imperiale, Italy

The imposing Swabian castle of Rocca Imperiale is on the top of the hill over which the whole residential area extends. The fortress was ordered by Frederic II of Swabia in 1221, and he ordered the construction or refurbishment of 200 castles for defensive purposes in southern Italy. The castle was built in a place of great military and strategic importance and surveillance extended to the whole of the Gulf of Taranto. The development of the residential area followed the construction of the castle, bringing in the people from a series of fortified settlements in the area. Many feudatory lords alternated in the government of the area, constantly under barbarian attack, in the following 200 years.

In 1664, the castle withstood the attack of 4000 Saracen pirates who devastated Rocca, destroying the old 13th century church in the old centre of which only the lovely Romanesque bell tower with mullioned windows and cornices remains. In 1989, the last heirs of the family owning the castle decided to donate it to the Municipality of Rocca Imperiale.

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Details

Founded: 1221
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.turiscalabria.it

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Filip Ussarz (10 months ago)
It was closed during day time till 17:30 in July. So no picture was taken inside... But guessing it is beautiful. Next time...
Andrei Nita (2 years ago)
An amazing spot in Calabria on the same level with Matera, Tropea and Assisi.
Brigitte Baaten (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle. Stayed there for about one hour. Ticket price 3 euro. Also walk along the streets of the old town, that's quite a picturesque walk.
Giuseppe Giuliano (3 years ago)
Very nice
Mirjana Kovac (4 years ago)
Good place to visit
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King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

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