The Port Wall in Chepstow is a late thirteenth century stone wall, which was constructed for the twin purposes of defence and tax collection by permitting users of the town's market only one point of access through the wall at the Town Gate. The wall originally formed a semi-circle extending for some 1,100 metres, roughly southwards from Chepstow Castle to the River Wye. It enclosed an area of 53 hectares, including the entire town and port as it existed at that time. Substantial sections of the wall remain intact.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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Ian Phillips (9 months ago)
Samson Caudron (15 months ago)
Giant big hole in the wall. Would walk through again 5/5
Mr. Omnifarious (3 years ago)
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